Approaches to studying when preparing for final exams as a function of coping strategies

Moneta, Giovanni B.; Spada, Marcantonio M. and Rost, Felicitas M. (2007). Approaches to studying when preparing for final exams as a function of coping strategies. Personality and Individual Differences, 43(1) pp. 191–202.

DOI: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.paid.2006.12.002

Abstract

This study investigated how coping strategies students adopt when preparing for final exams influence their approaches to studying. It was hypothesized that adaptive coping strategies (self-help, approach, and accommodation) would be associated with the adoption of deep and strategic approaches to studying, whereas maladaptive coping strategies (avoidance and self-punishment) would be associated with the adoption of a surface approach to studying. A sample of 135 undergraduate university students completed the R-COPE, the Approaches and Study Skills Inventory for Students (ASSIST), the Evaluation Anxiety Scale (EVAN), and the General Self-efficacy Scale (GSES) 2 weeks before final exams. In a multivariate regression model controlling for measurement error, gender, and confounding by general self-efficacy and evaluation anxiety, approach coping predicted deep and strategic approaches to studying, self-help coping predicted a strategic approach to studying, and avoidance coping predicted a surface approach to studying. The hypotheses were fully supported for approach and avoidance coping, partially supported for self-help coping, and disconfirmed for accommodation and self-punishment coping. The implications of these findings are outlined.

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