Unbiased Proteomic Approach Identifies Pathobiological Profiles in the Brains of Preclinical Models of Repetitive Mild Traumatic Brain Injury, Tauopathy, and Amyloidosis

Ojo, Joseph O.; Crynen, Gogce; Algamal, Moustafa; Vallabhaneni, Prashanti; Leary, Paige; Mouzon, Benoit; Reed, Jon M.; Mullan, Michael and Crawford, Fiona (2020). Unbiased Proteomic Approach Identifies Pathobiological Profiles in the Brains of Preclinical Models of Repetitive Mild Traumatic Brain Injury, Tauopathy, and Amyloidosis. ASN Neuro, 12 pp. 1–24.

DOI: https://doi.org/10.1177/1759091420914768

Abstract

No concerted investigation has been conducted to explore overlapping and distinct pathobiological mechanisms between repetitive mild traumatic brain injury (r-mTBI) and tau/amyloid proteinopathies considering the long history of association between TBI and Alzheimer’s disease. We address this problem by using unbiased proteomic approaches to generate detailed time-dependent brain molecular profiles of response to repetitive mTBI in C57BL/6 mice and in mouse models of amyloidosis (with amyloid precursor protein KM670/671NL (Swedish) and Presenilin 1 M146L mutations [PSAPP]) and tauopathy (hTau). Brain tissues from animals were collected at different timepoints after injuries (24 hr–12 months post-injury) and at different ages for tau or amyloid transgenic models (3, 9, and 15 months old), encompassing the pre-, peri-, and post-“onset” of cognitive and pathological phenotypes. We identified 30 hippocampal and 47 cortical proteins that were significantly modulated over time in the r-mTBI compared with sham mice. These proteins identified TBI-dependent modulation of phosphatidylinositol-3-kinase/AKT signaling, protein kinase A signaling, and PPARα/RXRα activation in the hippocampus and protein kinase A signaling, gonadotropin-releasing hormone signaling, and B cell receptor signaling in the cortex. Previously published neuropathological studies of our mTBI model showed a lack of amyloid and tau pathology. In PSAPP mice, we identified 19 proteins significantly changing in the cortex and only 7 proteins in hTau mice versus wild-type littermates. When we explored the overlap between our r-mTBI model and the PSAPP/hTau models, a fairly small coincidental change was observed involving only eight significantly regulated proteins. This work suggests a very distinct TBI neurodegeneration and also that other factors are needed to drive pathologies such as amyloidosis and tauopathy postinjury.

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