The Role Of Perceived Stress And Personality In Symptom Experience Of Chronic Inflammatory Bowel Disease.

Sadler, Andrew (2000). The Role Of Perceived Stress And Personality In Symptom Experience Of Chronic Inflammatory Bowel Disease. MPhil thesis The Open University.

DOI: https://doi.org/10.21954/ou.ro.0000f996

Abstract

Two studies were performed with participants suffering from one of two inflammatory bowel diseases (Crohn’s Disease or Ulcerative Colitis). One of the main thrusts of the research was to compare two theoretical models of the stress and illness relationship (namely the Transactional model and the negative affectivity/latent variable model). The first study, a cross-sectional design was intended to elucidate some of the demographic, personological, and behavioural factors involved in experience of disease activity. Disease differences and gender differences are also discussed. Personological, behavioural, and medical factors were used to attempt to predict disease experience outcome - perceived stress, neuroticism, and perceived disease severity being notable successes in predicting disease experience outcome over and above clinical predictors used. The second study, a pilot of a longitudinal study, investigated the temporal relationship between these psychological factors and the daily course of the disease over a 28-day period. The results from both studies support the theory of a link between perceived stress and disease activity experience. The results from both studies are also used to attempt to evaluate two models of stress and illness (Transactional and latent variable). The success of this support for either theory is limited and is discussed in detail. Both studies do, however, show the importance of considering psychological factors in these disease populations.

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