The affective development of biology students in further education. The construction and evaluation of a test related to O- and A-level courses in biology, with particular reference to the affective domain. Use of the test to obtain diagnostic and predictive information.

Bentley, Gerald Ian (1980). The affective development of biology students in further education. The construction and evaluation of a test related to O- and A-level courses in biology, with particular reference to the affective domain. Use of the test to obtain diagnostic and predictive information. MPhil thesis The Open University.

DOI: https://doi.org/10.21954/ou.ro.0000f746

Abstract

The thesis is divided into three parts. In Part One, the literature relating to affective characteristics and science education is reviewed. In Part Two, the theory and measurement of effective characteristics are discussed.

Part three describes the design and use of a questionnaire to measure the affective development of further education students in the biological sciences, A taxonomic model of affective development forms the basis of the instrument.

The results provide evidence that supports the validity of a taxonomic model of affective development. Students studying for GCE A-level in the biological sciences are shorn to have reached higher states of affective development than GCE 0-level students.

'Affective Profiles' can provide a useful graphic representation of the level of affective development reached by individual students and such profiles can, in conjunction with cognitive data, aid in the prediction of academic success.

The level of affective development reached by groups of students is found to be related to gender and vocational grouping. Females obtain higher scores at the lower levels of the taxonomy, but males are more likely to obtain high scores at the higher levels. Students tend to reach higher levels of affective development if they are following courses which are vocationally related to biology.

The study has not identified any clear pattern of relationship between affective development and cognitive development, which would allow academic success to be predicted from a knowledge of affective development alone.

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