Self-reported effects of attending the Health Foundation's Co-Creating Health self-management programme for patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus in London, England

Kosmala-Anderson, Joanna P.; Wallace, Louise M.; Turner, Andrew and Bourne, Claire (2014). Self-reported effects of attending the Health Foundation's Co-Creating Health self-management programme for patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus in London, England. Archives of Medical Science, 10(4) pp. 773–781.

DOI: https://doi.org/10.5114/aoms.2014.44869

Abstract

Introduction: The purpose of this study was to determine the impact of the Health Foundation's Co-Creating Health (CCH) group self-management programme (SMP) for adult patients with type 2 diabetes on patient activation and quality of life. Material and methods: We conducted a multisite longitudinal study of 283 patients (mean age 62.3 years, SD 11.1; 43 ethnic minority; 51 female). Primary outcomes were patient activation, and diabetes and health related quality of life. Secondary outcomes included health status, psychological distress, and self-management ability. Data were collected immediately before the first SMP session (baseline) and 6 months after completing the programme. Quantitative analyses were based on mixed models using intent-to-treat and per-protocol procedures. Results: Sixty percent of patients who signed up for SMP completed the programme. Patient activation significantly improved 6 months after the SMP (p < 0.0001), and 60.2 of course completers showed meaningful improvement. Diabetes-related quality of life also improved significantly 6 months post course (p < 0.0001). About a quarter of SMP completers showed substantial improvement in self-management skills. Conclusions: Attending the UK SMP for adults with type 2 diabetes leads to improvements in patient activation, diabetes-related quality of life, and improved confidence and ability to self-manage their condition. Improvement in patient activation is an important finding because activated patients participate in collaborative decision-making with their clinicians, report improved health-related behaviours and clinical outcomes, and better adhere to treatment.

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