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Items Authored or Edited by Edmund King

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Group by: Published Date | Item Type | Authors/Editors/Creators | No Grouping
Jump to: 2014 | 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 | 2009 | 2008 | 2004
Number of items: 17.

2014

King, Edmund (2014). E. W. Hornung’s unpublished “Diary,” the YMCA, and the reading soldier in the First World War. English Literature in Transition, 1880-1920, 57(3) pp. 361–387. restricted access item, not available for direct download

King, Edmund (2014). “A priceless book to have out here”: soldiers reading Shakespeare in the first world war. Shakespeare, 10(3) pp. 230–244. restricted access item, not available for direct download

2013

King, Edmund (2013). “Books are more to me than food”: British prisoners of war as readers, 1914-1918. Book History, 16 pp. 246–271. file

2012

King, Edmund G. C. (2012). Cardenio and the Eighteenth-century Shakespeare Canon. In: Carnegie, David and Taylor, Gary eds. The Quest for Cardenio: Shakespeare, Fletcher, Cervantes and the Lost Play. Oxford: Oxford University Press, pp. 81–94. filefile

2011

King, Edmund (2011). Reading the Great War through Wilfrid Scawen Blunt: J. A. Fallows, MA, and His Copy of My Diaries, 1900–1914. In: Society for the History of Authorship, Reading and Publishing Regional Conference , 28-30 April 2011, University of Queensland, Brisbane, Australia.

King, Edmund (2011). A captive audience? The reading lives of Australian prisoners of war, 1914–18. In: Open University Book History and Bibliography Research Group Seminars: Reading andthe First World War, 12 February 2011, London, UK.

King, Edmund C. G. (2011). Man of science, man of religion: the reading of a medical missionary in Uganda, 1896-1918. In: SHARP 2011: The Book in Art and Science, 14-17 July 2011, Washington, D.C., USA.

2010

King, Edmund (2010). Narratives about collaborating playwrights: the new bibliography, “disintegration”, and the problem of multiple authorship in Shakespeare. In: Johnson, Laurie and Chalk, Darryl eds. “Rapt in Secret Studies”: Emerging Shakespeares. Newcastle Upon Tyne: Cambridge Scholars Publishing, pp. 249–268. file

King, Edmund G. C. (2010). Fragmenting authorship in the eighteenth-century Shakespeare edition. Shakespeare, 6(1) pp. 1–19. file

King, Edmund (2010). Alexander Turnbull's ‘dream imperial’: collecting Shakespeare in the colonial antipodes. Script and Print: Bulletin of the Bibliographical Society of Australia and New Zealand, 34(2) pp. 69–86. file

King, Edmund G. C. (2010). Towards a prehistory of the gothic mode in nineteenth-century New Zealand writing. Journal of New Zealand Literature, 28(2) pp. 35–57. file

2009

King, Edmund (2009). Lewis Theobald, Double Falshood, and the 1733 Works of Shakespeare. In: International Cardenio Colloquium, 22-24 May 2009, Victoria University of Wellington, New Zealand.

2008

King, Edmund (2008). Jacob’s Sons in the South Pacific: The Geoeschatology of Edwin Fairburn’s "Ships of Tarshish". In: Flogging a Dead Horse: Are National Literatures Finished? A Stout Research Centre in the Humanities Conference, 10-13 Dec 2008, Victoria University of Wellington, New Zealand.

King, Edmund (2008). The Shakespearean Book in the Colonial Antipodes: The Case of Alexander Turnbull. In: Bibliographical Society of Australia and New Zealand Conference, 2008, 2-3 Oct 2008, University of Sydney, Australia.

King, Edmund (2008). Pope's 1723–25 Shakespear, classical editing, and humanistic reading practices. Eighteenth-Century Life, 32(2) pp. 3–13. file

King, Edmund (2008). "Fragments minutely broken": text, paratext, and authorship in the eighteenth-century Shakespeare edition. In: Australia and New Zealand Shakespeare Association Conference, 2008, 6-9 February 2008, University of Otago, Dunedin, New Zealand.

2004

King, Edmund (2004). “Small-scale copyrights”?: Quotation marks in theory and in practice. Papers of the Bibliographical Society of America, 98(1) pp. 39–53. file

This list was generated on Fri Oct 24 03:10:56 2014 BST.

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