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Number of items at this level: 302.

(2005). The mathematics of sex: one to two, or two to one? In: ed. Sexuality and culture in medieval and renaissance Europe. Studies in Medieval and Renaissance History, 2 (3). New York, NY U.S.: AMS Press, pp. 47–58. restricted access item, not available for direct download

Alzola Romero, Aarón ed. (2011). Archaeology for the Masses: Theoretical and Methodological Approaches to a Neglected Identity Category. Oxford, UK: British Archaeological Reports (In Press).

Barker, Elton; Bouzarovski, Stefan; Isaksen, Leif and Pelling, Chris eds. (2013). New Worlds out of Old Texts: Approaches to the Spatial Analysis of Ancient Greek Literature. Oxford: Oxford University Press (forthcoming).

Carroll, Maureen and Graham, Emma-Jayne eds. (2014). Infant Health and Death in Roman Italy and Beyond. Journal of Roman Archaeology Supplementary Series, 96. Ann Arbor: Journal of Roman Archaeology.

Courtney, Julia and James, Paula eds. (2006). The Role of the Parrot in Selected Texts from Ovid to Jean Rhys: Telling a Story from an Alternative Viewpoint. Lampeter: Edwin Mellen Press.

Devlin, Zoe and Graham, Emma-Jayne eds. (2013). Death Embodied: Archaeological Approaches to the Treatment of the Corpse. Oxford: Oxbow (In press).

Emlyn-Jones, Chris ed. (2007). Plato, Republic 1-2.368c4. Aris and Phillips Classical Commenatries Series. Oxford, UK: Oxbow Books.

Hales, Shelley and Paul, Joanna eds. (2011). Pompeii in the Public Imagination from its Rediscovery to Today. Classical Presences. Oxford: Oxford University Press.

Hardwick, Lorna and Gillespie, Carol eds. (2007). Classics in Post-Colonial Worlds. Classical Presences. Oxford, UK: Oxford University Press.

Hope, Valerie M. and Huskinson, Janet eds. (2011). Memory and Mourning: Studies on Roman Death. Oxford: Oxbow Books.

Horstmansoff, Manfred; King, Helen and Zittel, Claus eds. (2012). Blood, Sweat and Tears – The Changing Concepts of Physiology from Antiquity into Early Modern Europe. Intersections: Interdisciplinary Studies in Early Modern Culture, 25. Leiden: Brill.

Rebay-Salisbury, Katharina; Sorensen, Marie Louise Stig and Hughes, Jessica eds. (2010). Body Parts and Bodies Whole. Changing Relations and Meanings. Oxford: Oxbow.

Sandwell, Isabella and Huskinson, Janet eds. (2003). Culture and Society in late Roman Antioch. Oxford, UK: Oxbow.

Swaddling, Judith and Perkins, Philip eds. (2009). Etruscan by Definition: The Cultural, Regional and Personal Identity of the Etruscans. The British Museum Research Publications (173). London: The British Museum Press.

Alzola Romero, Aaron (2008). Los sitios de cada cosa: propuesta intercontextual para el estudio de las interacciones sociales en la protohistoria de la Cataluña Meridional. In: Miñarro Casas, Marta and Valenzuela-Lamas, Silvia eds. Actes del I Congrés de Joves Investigadors en Arqueologia dels Països Catalans: La Protohistòria als Països Catalans. Arqueomediterrània (10). Barcelona: Universidad de Barcelona, pp. 205–214.

Alzola Romero, Aaron and Sánchez Moreno, Eduardo (2011). Fabricating Celts: how Iron Age Iberians became Indo-Europeanized during the Franco regime. In: Proceedings of the Harvard Celtic Colloquium 2009, 9-11 October 2009, Harvard University, Boston.

Alzola Romero, Aaron (2006). Adaptación y aplicación del sistema de cuantificación PIE-Slice, un método para el estudio estadístico de covarianza. Kalathos: Revista del seminario de arqueología y etnología turolense, 24-25 pp. 47–67.

Alzola Romero, Aaron (2003). /Whois? Identity: collectivity and the self in IRC. PsychNology Journal, 1(2) pp. 87–130.

Alzola Romero, Aaron (2012). One laptop per college student? Exploring the links between access to IT hardware and academic performance in higher education e-learning programs. Journal of Distance Education, 26(1)

Alzola Romero, Aaron (2005). ¿Colonizadores colonizados? Acercamientos teóricos recientes al papel fenicio en el sur de la Península Ibérica. In: Blanco, Antonio; Cancelo, Carlos and Esparza, Ángel eds. Bronce Final y Edad del Hierro en la Península Ibérica: Encuentro de Jóvenes Investigadores. Aquilafuente (86). Salamanca: Universidad de Salamanca, pp. 469–478.

Baker, Patty; King, Helen and Totelin, Laurence (2014). Teaching ancient medicine: the issues of abortion. In: Rabinowitz, Nancy Sorkin and McHardy, Fiona eds. From Abortion to Pederasty: Addressing Difficult Topics in the Classics Classroom. Columbus, OH: Ohio State University Press, pp. 71–91.

Bakogianni, Anastasia (2008). All is well that ends tragically: filming Greek tragedy in modern Greece. Bulletin of the Institute of Classical Studies, 51 pp. 119–167.

Bakogianni, Anastasia (2009). The taming of a tragic heroine: Electra in eighteenth-century art. International Journal of the Classical Tradition, 16(1) pp. 19–57.

Bakogianni, Anastasia (2009). Voices of resistance: Michael Cacoyannis’ The Trojan Women (1971). The Bulletin of the Institute of Classical Studies, 52(1) pp. 45–68.

Bakogianni, Anastasia (2009). Electra in Sylvia Plath’s poetry: a case of identification. In: Harrison, Stephen J. ed. Living Classics: Greece and Rome in Contemporary Poetry in English. Oxford: OUP, pp. 194–217.

Bakogianni, Anastasia (2007). An eighteenth-century jealous woman and a twentieth-century hysterical diva: the case of Mozart's Idomeneo (1781) and Strauss' Elektra (1909). New Voices in Classical Reception Studies, 2 pp. 1–32. file

Bakogianni, Anastasia (2011). Electra Ancient and Modern: Aspects of the Reception of the Tragic Heroine. Bulletin of the Institute of Classical Studies Supplement , 113. London: Institute of Classical Studies.

Bakogianni, Anastasia (2013). ‘Who rules this nation? (Ποιός κυβερνά αυτόν τον τόπο;): political intrigue and the struggle for power in Michael Cacoyannis’ Iphigenia (1977)’. In: Bakogianni, Anastasia ed. Dialogues with the Past: Classical Reception Theory and Practice. BICS Supplement, 1 (126.1). London: Institute of Classical Studies, 225-249. file

Bakogianni, Anastasia (2013). Demotic power to the people: the triumph of dimotiki, the triumph of Medea. In: Hardwick, Lorna and Harrison, Stephen eds. Classics in the Modern World: A Democratic Turn? Classical Presences. Oxford: Oxford University Press, pp. 197–212.

Bakogianni, Anastasia (2013). Annihilating Clytemnestra: the severing of the mother-daughter bond in Michael Cacoyannis’ Iphigenia (1977). In: Nikoloutsos , Konstantinos P. ed. Ancient Greek Women in Film. Classical Presences. Oxford: Oxford University Press, pp. 207–234.

Barker, Elton (2009). Entering the Agon: Dissent and authority in Homer, historiography and tragedy. Oxford, UK: Oxford University Press.

Barker, Elton (2004). The fall-out from dissent: hero and audience in Sophocles' Ajax. Greece & Rome, 51(1) pp. 1–20.

Barker, Elton (2006). Paging the oracle: interpretation, identity and performance in Herodotus’ History. Greece & Rome, 53(1) pp. 1–28. file

Barker, Elton (2004). Achilles' last stand: Institutionalising dissent in Homer's Iliad. Proceedings of the Cambridge Philological Society pp. 92–120. file

Barker, Elton (2011). The Iliad’s big swoon: a case of innovation within the epic tradition. Trends in Classics, 3(1) pp. 1–17. restricted access item, not available for direct download

Barker, Elton (2004). Between a rock and a safe place: the chorus becoming citizens in Sophocles’ Ajax. In: Actas del Congreso Internacional con motivo del XXV Centenario del nacimiento de Sófocles , 2003, Málaga.

Barker, Elton (2011). ‘Possessing an unbridled tongue’: frank speech and speaking back in Euripides’ Orestes. In: Carter, David ed. Why Athens? A Reappraisal of Tragic Politics. Oxford: Oxford University Press, pp. 145–162.

Barker, Elton (2013). All mod cons: power, openness and text in a digital turn. In: Hardwick, Lorna and Harrison, Stephen eds. Classics in the Modern World: A ‘Democratic Turn’? Oxford: Oxford University Press, pp. 411–426.

Barker, Elton; Bissell, Christopher; Hardwick, Lorna; Jones, Allan; Ridge, Mia and Wolffe, John (2012). Digital technologies: help or hindrance for the humanities? Arts and Humanities in Higher Education, 11(1-2) pp. 185–200.

Barker, Elton and Bouzarovski, Stefan (2013). Towards a qualitative network analysis of Herodotus 5. In: Barker, Elton; Bouzarovski, Stefan; Isaksen, Leif and Pelling, Chris eds. New Worlds out of Old Texts: Approaches to the Spatial Analysis of Ancient Greek Literature. Oxford: Oxford University Press, (In press).

Barker, Elton; Bouzarovski, Stefan and Isaksen, Leif (2013). New worlds out of old texts. In: Barker, Elton; Bouzarovski, Stefan; Isaksen, Leif and Pelling, Chris eds. New Worlds out of Old Texts: Approaches to the Spatial Analysis of Ancient Greek Literature. Oxford: Oxford University Press, (In press).

Barker, Elton; Bouzarovski, Stefan; Isaksen, Leif and Pelling, Chris (2013). Writing space, living space: time, agency and place relations in Herodotus’s Histories. In: Heirman, Jo and Klooster, Jacqueline eds. The Ideologies of Lived Space in Literary Texts, Ancient and Modern. Ghent: Academia Press, pp. 229–247. file

Barker, Elton; Bouzarovski, Stefan; Pelling, Chris and Isaksen, Leif (2010). Mapping an ancient historian in a digital age: the Herodotus Encoded Space-Text-Image Archive (HESTIA). Leeds International Classical Studies, 9(2010) article no. 1. file

Barker, Elton; Bouzarovski, Stefan; Pelling, Chris and Isaksen, Leif (2011). HESTIA (the Herodotus Encoded Space-Text-Imaging Archive): An Interdisciplinary Project. European Science Foundation, Strasbourg. file

Barker, Elton and Christensen, Joel (2006). Flight club: the new Archilochus and its resonance with Homeric epic. Materiali e discussioni per l'analisi dei testi classici, 57(2) pp. 9–41. file

Barker, Elton and Christensen, Joel (2011). On not remembering Tydeus: Diomedes and the contest for Thebes. Materiali e discussioni per l’analisi dei testi classici, 66(1) pp. 9–44.

Barker, Elton and Christensen, Joel (2013). A Beginner’s Guide to Homer. London: One World.

Barker, Elton and Isaksen, Leif (2013). Digital approaches to analysing spatial relationships in Herodotus 5. In: Barker, Elton; Bouzarovski, Stefan; Isaksen, Leif and Pelling, Chris eds. New Worlds out of Old Texts: Approaches to the Spatial Analysis of Ancient Greek Literature. Oxford: Oxford University Press, (In press).

Barker, Elton; Isaksen, Leif; Byrne, Kate and Kansa, Eric (2011). GAP: a neogeo approach to classical resources. In: European Conference on Complex Systems 2010, 15 September 2010, Lisbon, Portugal. restricted access item, not available for direct download

Barker, Elton; Isaksen, Leif; Rabinowitz, Nick; Bouzarovski, Stefan and Pelling, Chris (2013). On using a digital resources for the study of an ancient text: the case of Herodotus’ Histories. In: Dunn, Stuart and Mahony, Simon eds. The Digital Classicist. Bulletin of the Institute of Classical Studies Supplement (122). Institute of Classical Studies, University of London, pp. 45–62. file

Barker, Elton and Pelling, Chris (2013). Space-Travelling in Herodotus 5. In: Barker, Elton; Bouzarovski, Stefan; Isaksen, Leif and Pelling, Chris eds. New Worlds out of Old Texts: Approaches to the Spatial Analysis of Ancient Greek Literature. Oxford University Press, (forthcoming).

Barker, Elton T. E. (2008). Momos advises Zeus: changing representations of ‘Cypria’ fragment 1. In: Cingano, Ettore and Milano, Lucio eds. Papers on Ancient Literatures: Greece, Rome and the Near East: Proceedings of the “Advanced Seminar in the Humanities”, Venice International University 2004-2005. Padova: S.A.R.G.O.N. Editrice e Libreria, pp. 33–73. file

Barker, Elton T. E. and Christensen, Joel P. (2008). Oedipus of many pains: Strategies of contest in Homeric poetry. Leeds International Classical Studies, 7/2008(2) article no. 7.2. file

Betts, Eleanor (2013). Cubrar matrer: goddess of the Picenes? Accordia Research Papers, 12 pp. 119–147. restricted access item, not available for direct download

Betts, Eleanor (2011). Towards a multisensory experience of movement in the City of Rome. In: Laurence, Ray and Newsome, David J. eds. Rome, Ostia and Pompeii: Movement and Space. Oxford: Oxford University Press, pp. 118–132. file

Betts, Eleanor (2003). The sacred landscape of Picenum (900-100 BC): towards a phenomenology of cult places. In: Wilkins, John B. and Herring, Edward eds. Inhabiting Symbols: symbol and image in the ancient Mediterranean. Accordia Specialist Studies on the Mediterranean (5). London: Accordia Research Institute, University of London, pp. 101–120.

Budelmann, Felix (2004). Greek tragedies in West African adaptations. Proceedings of the Cambridge Philological Society, 50 pp. 1–28.

Budelmann, Felix (2006). The mediated ending of Sophocles' Oedipus Tyrannus. Materiali e discussioni per l'analisi dei testi classici, 57 pp. 43–62.

Budelmann, Felix (2007). The reception of Sophocles' representation of physical pain. American Journal of Philology, 128(4) pp. 443–467.

Budelmann, Felix (2001). Sound and text: the rhythm and metre of archaic and classical Greek poetry in ancient and Byzantine scholarship. In: Budelmann, Felix and Michelakis, Pantelis eds. Homer, tragedy and beyond: studies in honour of P. E. Easterling. London, UK: Society for the Promotion of Hellenic Studies, pp. 209–240.

Budelmann, Felix (2007). Trojan Women in Yorubaland: Femi Osofisan's Women of Owu. In: Hardwick, Lorna and Gillespie, Carol eds. Classics in Post-Colonial Worlds. Oxford: Oxford University Press, pp. 15–39.

Budelmann, Felix (2006). Körper und Geist in tragischen Schmerz-Szenen. In: Seidensticker, Bernd and Vöhler, Martin eds. Gewalt und Ästhetik: Zur Gewalt und ihrer Darstellung in der griechischen Klassik. Berlin, Germany: De Gruyter, pp. 123–148.

Burillo Mozota, Francisco and Alzola Romero, Aarón (2005). Food, drink and the Other in the Celtiberian city-state of Segeda I (Zaragoza, Spain). Archaeological Review from Cambridge, 20(2) pp. 69–81.

Emlyn-Jones, Chris (2004). The dramatic poet and his audience: Agathon and Socrates in Plato's "Symposium". Hermes: Zeitschrift für klassische philologie, 132(4) pp. 389–405.

Emlyn-Jones, Chris (2007). Poets on Socrates' stage: Plato's reception of dramatic art. In: Hardwick, Lorna and Stray, Christopher eds. Companion to Classical Receptions. Blackwell Companions to the Ancient World. Oxford, UK: Blackwell Publishing, pp. 38–49.

Fear, Trevor (2005). Propertian closure: the elegiac inscription of the liminal male and ideological contestation in Augustan Rome. In: Ancona, Ronnie and Greene, Ellen eds. Gendered Dynamics in Latin Love Poetry. Arethusa Books. Baltimore, US: The John Hopkins University Press, pp. 13–40.

Fear, Trevor (2007). Of Aristocrats and Courtesans: Seneca, De Beneficiis 1.14. Hermes: Zeitschrift für klassische philologie, 135(4) pp. 460–468. file

Fear, Trevor (2010). Interdictiones domo et ingenio: Timagenes and Propertius: a reading in the dynamics of Augustan exclusion. Arethusa, 43(3) pp. 429–438. restricted access item, not available for direct download

Fear, Trevor (2011). New Voices In Classical Reception Studies Vol. 6 (2011). The Open University.

Fear, Trevor (2012). Ah pereant, si quos ianua clausa iuvat: Propertius 2.23 and the revision of the elegiac code. Classica et Mediaevalia, 63 file

Fear, Trevor (2012). New Voices in Classical Reception Studies Vol. 7 (2012). The Open University.

Feldherr, Andrew and James, Paula (2004). Making the most of Marsyas. Arethusa, 37(1) pp. 75–104.

Fentress, Elizabeth; Fontana, Sergio; Hitchner, R. Bruce and Perkins, Philip (2004). Accounting for ARS: fineware and sites in Sicily and Africa. In: Alcock, Susan E. and Cherry, John F. eds. Side-by-side survey: comparative regional studies in the Mediterranean world. Oxford, UK: Oxbow Books, pp. 147–162.

Graham, Emma-Jayne (2006). The Burial of the Urban Poor in Italy in the Late Roman Republic and Early Empire. BAR international series (1565). Oxford: Archaeopress.

Graham, Emma-Jayne (2009). Becoming persons, becoming ancestors: personhood, memory and the corpse in Roman rituals of social remembrance. Archaeological Dialogues, 16(1) pp. 51–74.

Graham, Emma-Jayne (2013). The making of infants in Hellenistic and early Roman Italy: a votive perspective. World Archaeology, 45(2) pp. 215–231.

Graham, Emma-Jayne (2005). The quick and the dead in the extra-urban landscape: the Roman cemetery at Ostia/Portus as a lived environment. In: Bruhn, James; Croxford, Ben and Grigoropoulos, Dimitris eds. TRAC 2004: Proceedings of the Fourteenth Annual Theoretical Roman Archaeology Conference, Durham 2004. Oxford: Oxbow Books, pp. 133–143.

Graham, Emma-Jayne (2014). Infant votives and swaddling in Hellenistic Italy. In: Carroll, Maureen and Graham, Emma-Jayne eds. Infant Health and Death in Roman Italy and Beyond. Journal of Roman Archaeology Supplementary Series (96). Ann Arbor: Journal of Roman Archaeology, pp. 23–46.

Graham, Emma-Jayne (2005). Dining al fresco with the living and the dead in Roman Italy. In: Carroll, Maureen; Hadley, D. M. and Willmott, Hugh eds. Consuming Passions: Dining from Antiquity to the Eighteenth Century. Revealing history. Stroud: Tempus, pp. 49–65.

Graham, Emma-Jayne (2006). Discarding the destitute: ancient and modern attitudes towards burial practice and memory preservation amongst the lower classes of Rome. In: Croxford, Ben; Goodchild, Helen; Lucas, Jason and Nick, Ray eds. TRAC 2005: Proceedings of the Fifteenth Annual Theoretical Roman Archaeology Conference. Birmingham 2005. Oxford: Oxbow, pp. 57–71.

Graham, Emma-Jayne (2013). ‘There buds the laurel’: Approaching nature and place in the cemeteries of Roman Italy. In: Croxford, Ben and Lucas, Jason eds. Experiencing Space and Place in the Roman World. Oxford: Oxbow, (In press).

Graham, Emma-Jayne (2013). Corporeal concerns: the role of the body in the transformation of Roman mortuary practices. In: Devlin, Zoe and Graham, Emma-Jayne eds. Death Embodied: Archaeological Approaches to the Treatment of the Corpse. Oxford: Oxbow, (In press).

Graham, Emma-Jayne (2011). Memory and materiality: re-embodying the Roman funeral. In: Hope, Valerie and Huskinson, Janet eds. Memory and Mourning: Studies on Roman Death. Oxford: Oxbow, pp. 21–39. file

Graham, Emma-Jayne (2013). Disparate lives or disparate deaths? Post-mortem treatment of the body and the articulation of difference. In: Laes, Christian; Goodey, Chris and Rose, M. Lynn eds. Disabilities in Roman Antiquity: Disparate Bodies ‘A Capite ad Calcem’. Leiden: Brill, pp. 249–274.

Graham, Emma-Jayne and Hope, Valerie (2013). Funerary practices. In: Cooley, Alison ed. A Companion to Roman Italy. Wiley-Blackwell, (In press).

Green, Monica and King, Helen (2007). Structures and subjectivities in 16th-century gynaecology, or how the father of medicine reclaimed his paternity. In: Hartman, Joan E. and Seeff, Adele eds. Structures and subjectivities: Attending to early modern women. Center for Renaissance & Baroque Studies. Newark, DE: University of Delaware Press, pp. 100–101.

Hamilton, Walter and Emlyn-Jones, Chris (2004). Gorgias: revised edition translated by Walter Hamilton and Chris Emlyn-Jones: Introduction, commentary, and notes by Chris Emlyn-Jones. Penguin Books, UK.

Hardwick, Lorna (2001). Who owns the plays?: Issues in the translation and performance of Greek drama on the modern stage. Eirene (Studia Graeca et Latina, Theatralia)(XXXVll, Theatralia special edition) pp. 23–29.

Hardwick, Lorna (2002). Electra and the Theatre of Affliction: towards a textual turn? Didaskalia, 5(3)

Hardwick, Lorna (2001). The Reception of the texts and images of ancient Greece in late twentieth-century drama and poetry in English. Not Set, Milton Keynes, UK.

Hardwick, Lorna (2002). Classical texts in post-colonial literatures: consolation, redress and new beginnings in the work of Derek Walcott and Seamus Heaney. International Journal of the Classical Tradition, 9(2) pp. 236–256.

Hardwick, Lorna (2006). Murmurs in the Cathedral: the impact of translations from Greek poetry and drama on modern work in English by Michael Longley and Seamus Heaney. Yearbook of English Studies, 36(1) pp. 204–215.

Hardwick, Lorna (2007). Translating greek tragedy to the modern stage. Theatre Journal, 59(3) pp. 358–361.

Hardwick, Lorna (2009). Book Review: Heretical Hellenism: Women Writers, Ancient Greece and the Victorian Popular Imagination (Shanyn Fiske). Romanticism and Victorianism on the Net, 55,

Hardwick, Lorna (2004). Shards and suckers: modern receptions of homer. In: Fowler, Robert ed. The Cambridge companion to homer. The Cambridge Companion. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, pp. 344–362.

Hardwick, Lorna (2005). Refiguring Classical Texts: Aspects of the Postcolonial Condition. In: Goff, Barbara ed. Classics and Colonialism. London, UK: Duckworth, pp. 107–117.

Hardwick, Lorna (2007). Singing across the faultlines: cultural shifts in twentieth century receptions of Homer. In: Graziosi, Barbara and Greenwood, Emily eds. Homer in the 20th Century: Between World Literature and the Western Canon. Oxford, UK: Oxford University Press, pp. 47–71.

Hardwick, Lorna (2004). Greek drama and anti-colonialism: de-colonising classics. In: Hall, E.; Macintosh, F. and Wrigley, A. eds. Dionysus since 69: Greek tragedy at the dawn of the third millennium. Oxford, UK: Oxford University Press, pp. 219–242.

Hardwick, Lorna (2010). Negotiating Translation for the Stage. In: Hall, Edith and Harrop, Stephe eds. Theorising Performance: Greek drama, cultural history and critical practice. London: Duckworth, pp. 192–207.

Hardwick, Lorna (2007). Shades of multi-lingualism and multi-vocalism in modern performances of Greek tragedy in post-colonial contexts. In: Hardwick, Lorna and Gillespie, Carol eds. Classics in Post-Colonial Worlds. Classical Presences. Oxford: Oxford University Press, pp. 305–338.

Hardwick, Lorna (2009). Is 'the Frail Silken Line' worth more than 'a Fart in a Bearskin'? or, how translation practice matters in poetry and drama. In: Harrison, S. J. ed. Living Classics: Greece and Rome in Contemporary Poetry in English. Classical presences. Oxford: Oxford University Press, pp. 172–193.

Hardwick, Lorna (2007). Contests and Continuities in Classical Traditions: African Migrations in Greek Drama. In: Hilton, John and Gosling, Anne eds. Alma Parens Originalis? The Receptions of Classical Literature and Thought in Africa, Europe, the United States, and Cuba. Oxford, UK: Peter Lang, pp. 43–72.

Hardwick, Lorna (2006). Post-colonial studies. In: Kallendorf, Craig ed. A Companion to the Classical Tradition. Blackwell Companions to the Ancient World. Oxford, UK: Blackwell, pp. 312–327.

Hardwick, Lorna (2008). Translated Classics: Vibrant Hybrids or Shattered Icons? In: lianeri, Alexandra and Zajko, Vanda eds. Translation and the Classics: Identity as Change in the History of Culture. Classical Presences. Oxford, UK: Oxford University Press, pp. 341–366.

Hardwick, Lorna (2005). Staging Agamemnon: the languages of translation. In: Macintosh, F.; Michelakis, P.; Hall, E. and Taplin, O. eds. Agamemnon in Performance 458 BC to AD 2004. Oxford, UK: Oxford University Press, pp. 207–222.

Hardwick, Lorna (2006). Remodelling receptions: Greek drama as diaspora in performance. In: Martindale, C. and Thomas, R. eds. Classics and the uses of reception. Classical Receptions. Oxford, UK: Blackwell, pp. 204–215.

Hardwick, Lorna (2009). Can (modern) poets do classical drama? The case of Ted Hughes. In: Rees, Roger ed. Ted Hughes and the Classics. Classical Presences. Oxford, UK: Oxford University Press, pp. 39–61.

Hardwick, Lorna (2006). Staging Sophocles in post-colonial contexts. In: Shiafkalis, Nicos ed. The Influence of Sophocles on Contemporary Theatre. Nicosia: International Theatre Institute, pp. 258–276.

Hardwick, Lorna (2007). Decolonising the mind?: Controversial productions of Greek Drama in late Twentieth-Century Britain and Ireland. In: Stray, Christopher ed. Remaking the Classics: literature, genre and media in Britain 1800-2000. London, UK: Duckworth, pp. 89–105.

Hardwick, Lorna (2010). Lysistratas on the modern stage. In: Stuttard, David ed. Looking at Lysistrata. London: Duckworth, pp. 80–89.

Hardwick, Lorna (2007). Text and Performance in Ancient Greek Plays on the Modern Stage: The Case of Aristophanes 'Ecclesiazusai'. In: Vivilakis, I. ed. Stephanos: Tribute to Walter Puchner. Athens: Ergo Editions, pp. 493–500.

Hardwick, Lorna (2005). The comic in the tragic: parody and critique in modern productions of Euripides’ Hecuba. Documenta (Special issue: The Performance of the Comic - eds Kolk, M. and Decreus, F.)), 23(3) pp. 306–315.

Hardwick, Lorna (2004). Sophocles’ Oedipus and conflicts of identity in post-colonial contexts. Documenta, 22(4) pp. 376–386.

Hardwick, Lorna (2003). Reception Studies. Greece and Rome: New Surveys in the Classics (33). Oxford, U.K.: Oxford University Press.

Hardwick, Lorna (2004). Translating words, Translating Cultures. Classical Inter/Faces. London, U.K.: Duckworth.

Hardwick, Lorna (1999). Placing Prometheus. In: Hardwick, Lorna ed. Tony Harrison's Poetry, Drama and Film: The Classical Dimension. Milton Keynes, U.K.: Dept of Classical Studies, the Open University, pp. 1–15.

Hardwick, Lorna (2000). Theatres of the mind: Greek tragedy in women's writings in English in the nineteenth century. In: Hardwick, Lorna; Easterling, P.E.; Ireland, S.; Lowe, N. and Macintosh, F. eds. Theatre Ancient and Modern. Milton Keynes, U.K.: Dept of Classical Studies, The Open University, pp. 68–81.

Hardwick, Lorna (2011). Antigone's journey: from Athens to Edinburgh via Athens and Tbilisi. In: Mee, Erin B. and Foley, Helene P. eds. Antigone on the Contemporary World Stage. Classical Presences. Oxford: Oxford University Press, pp. 392–406.

Hardwick, Lorna (2011). Fuzzy connections: classical texts and modern poetry in English. In: Parker, Jan and Mathews, Timothy eds. Tradition,Translation,Trauma: The Classic and the Modern. Classical Presences. Oxford: Oxford University Press, pp. 39–60.

Hazel, Ruth Mary (1999). The mediation in late twentieth-century English theatres of selected ancient Greek tragedy texts and themes concerned with women and power. PhD thesis The Open University. file

Hope, Valerie (2007). Death in Ancient Rome: A sourcebook. London, UK: Routledge.

Hope, Valerie (2009). Roman death: the dying and the dead in Ancient Rome. London: Continuum.

Hope, Valerie (2010). The end is to the beginning as the beginning is to the end. Birth, death and the classical body. In: Garrison, Daniel H. ed. A Cultural History of the Human Body in Antiquity. A Cultural History of the Human Body, 1. Oxford and New York: Berg Publishers, pp. 25–44.

Hope, Valerie (2009). At home with the dead: Roman funeral traditions and Trimalchio's tomb. In: Prag, Jonathan R. W. and Repath, Ian D. eds. Petronius: a Handbook. Chichester: John Wiley and Sons Ltd, pp. 140–160.

Hope, Valerie M. (2001). Constructing identity: the Roman funerary monuments of Aquileia, Mainz and Nimes. British Archaeological Reports, International Series (960). Oxford, UK: Archaeopress.

Hope, Valerie M. (2003). Trophies and tombstones: commemorating the Roman soldier. World Archaeology, 35(1) pp. 79–97.

Hope, Valerie M. (2003). Remembering Rome: memory, funerary monuments and the Roman soldier. In: Williams, Howard ed. Archaeologies of remembrance: death and memory in past societies. New York, USA: Kluwer Academic/Plenum Publishers, pp. 113–140.

Hope, Valerie (2011). Remembering to mourn: personal mementos of the dead in ancient Rome. In: Hope, Valerie and Huskinson, Janet eds. Memory and Mourning: Studies on Roman Death. Oxford: Oxbow Books, pp. 176–195.

Hope, Valerie (2011). Livia's tears: the presentation of Roman mourning. In: Whittaker, Helène ed. In Memoriam: Commemoration, Communal Memory and Gender Values in the Ancient Graeco-Roman World. Newcastle upon Tyne: Cambridge Scholars Press, pp. 91–125.

Hope, Valerie M. (2007). Age and the Roman soldier: the evidence of tombstones. In: Harlow, Mary and Laurence, Ray eds. Age and Ageing in the Roman Empire. Journal of Roman Archaeology, Supplementary Series (65). Portsmouth, RI, USA: Journal of Roman Archaeology, pp. 111–129.

Hope, Valerie M. (2011). Introduction. In: Hope, Valerie M. and Huskinson, Janet eds. Memory and Mourning: Studies on Roman Death. Oxford: Oxbow Books, xi-xxiv.

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