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Procession and possession in Glastonbury: Continuity, change and the manipulation of tradition

Bowman, Marion (2004). Procession and possession in Glastonbury: Continuity, change and the manipulation of tradition. Folklore, 115(3) pp. 273–285.

DOI (Digital Object Identifier) Link: http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/0015587042000284266
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Abstract

Glastonbury, a small town in the south-west of England, is considered significant by a variety of religious groups and spiritual seekers. While there is a large degree of peaceful co-existence between people holding radically different worldviews, the contested nature of Glastonbury as a spiritual centre is occasionally played out by means of public displays of religiosity, the most obvious example of which is the procession. This paper compares Christian and Goddess-oriented processions as case studies in the use of traditional means to assert historical, spatial and spiritual claims in contemporary Glastonbury.

Item Type: Journal Article
Copyright Holders: 2004 The Folklore Society
ISSN: 0015-587X
Extra Information: Presidential address given to the Folklore Society, March 2004 [1]
Academic Unit/Department: Arts > Religious Studies
Item ID: 9787
Depositing User: Marion Bowman
Date Deposited: 18 Oct 2007
Last Modified: 27 Jun 2011 11:28
URI: http://oro.open.ac.uk/id/eprint/9787
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