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Juridifications and religion in early modern Europe: The challenge of a contextual history of law

Saunders, David (2004). Juridifications and religion in early modern Europe: The challenge of a contextual history of law. Law and Critique, 15(2) pp. 99–118.

DOI (Digital Object Identifier) Link: http://dx.doi.org/10.1023/B:LACQ.0000035034.54275.fd
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Abstract

To end Europe's great cycle of religious wars, some early modern states imposed a secular ?rule of law? in spheres of life previously governed by religion. The following essay compares two instances of this basic fact of seventeenth-century European political history, one German and the other English. In these different religious and political settings, different juridifications were undertaken that do not reduce to manifestations of a single underlying process of social change. Considered in a legal-historical light, early modern juridifications therefore invite a clear disciplinary alternative to the socio-theoretical and socio-critical perspective on juridification associated with Jürgen Habermas. The larger challenge on behalf of legal history is to end the subordination of historical method to critical social theory.

Item Type: Journal Article
ISSN: 1572-8617
Keywords: Jürgen Habermas; juridification; legal history; Lord Nottingham; Martin Heckel; normativity; Samuel Pufendorf; secularisation; social theory; wars of religion;
Academic Unit/Department: Social Sciences > Sociology
Item ID: 9564
Depositing User: Mina Panchal
Date Deposited: 01 Oct 2007
Last Modified: 02 Dec 2010 20:04
URI: http://oro.open.ac.uk/id/eprint/9564
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