The Open UniversitySkip to content
 

Consuming Crime and Avoiding Punishment: Media Influence in the Shaping of Public Perceptions of Crime and Sentencing

Gillespie, Marie and McLaughlin, Eugene (2005). Consuming Crime and Avoiding Punishment: Media Influence in the Shaping of Public Perceptions of Crime and Sentencing. In: Emsley, Clive ed. The Persistent Prison: Problems, Images and Alternatives. London, UK: Francis Bootle Publications, pp. 113–143.

URL: http://www.francisboutle.co.uk/booklist/prison/ind...
Google Scholar: Look up in Google Scholar

Abstract

This chapter is based on research funded by the Esmee Fairbairn Foundation: Re-thinking Crime and Punishment. It argues that crime dramas are just as influential as crime news in shaping public understanding of sentencing. Sentencing issues have relatively low media priority. Crime is more dramatic and appealing to audiences than punishment. Even avid consumers of media crime can avoid reflecting on punishment because of the way crime narratives are typically structured. This makes securing public approval for alternatives to prison more difficult. This research and chapter is widely cited and contributed to storylines about the value of community based sentencing in three soap operas.

Item Type: Book Chapter
ISBN: 1-903427-24-X, 978-1-903427-24-8
Academic Unit/Department: Social Sciences > Sociology
Arts > History
Interdisciplinary Research Centre: Centre for Citizenship, Identities and Governance (CCIG)
International Centre for Comparative Criminological Research (ICCCR)
Item ID: 9233
Depositing User: Marie Gillespie
Date Deposited: 18 Sep 2007
Last Modified: 02 Dec 2010 20:04
URI: http://oro.open.ac.uk/id/eprint/9233
Share this page:

Actions (login may be required)

View Item
Report issue / request change

Policies | Disclaimer

© The Open University   + 44 (0)870 333 4340   general-enquiries@open.ac.uk