“Aao Hindi bole” - Improving inclusive practice by assessing the impact of Hindi language learning in early years practitioners in the UK

Bhandari, Renu (2022). “Aao Hindi bole” - Improving inclusive practice by assessing the impact of Hindi language learning in early years practitioners in the UK. In: Diversity and social justice in language learning, teaching and research: bringing theory and practice together, 14 Jun 2022, Online.

Abstract

The aim of the present study was to plan, design and deliver a Hindi speaking short language programme to early years professionals and evaluate its effectiveness through reflections of these professionals. Most early years settings in the UK use English as a key language of delivery in their settings (Rojas -Bustos, 2020). Despite inclusion and inclusive practice research focus, studies highlight that there is still an absence of minoritized languages in early years settings (Rojas-Bustos, 2020). The hypotheses for the present study were that the early years work force will identify some key areas of usage of Hindi that they will incorporate in their diverse settings to improve inclusion. The second hypotheses stated that new Hindi learning will initiate the development of communities of practice in all early years professionals. In the present study, 28 (in small groups of 6-8) women early years practitioners participated for practice-based learning Hindi language training. The Assessment approach in this language training programme was prepare, enact, reflect query. A one-hour short training programme was delivered with interactive tasks and assessments in line with the learning outcomes. The results were analysed qualitatively with Thematic analysis of reflections by the practitioners. Results indicated that all participants had gained content that they would apply well to their settings. Building the communities of practice. The results are discussed in light of the socio-cultural perspective (Salomon & Perkins, 1996; Salomon & Perkins, 1998), cultural historical activity theory (CHAT) (Brennan, 2018) among others. This study has clear implications for all key stake holders- namely parents, children, early years professionals and settings. The study clearly concludes that interactive, short, peer-based Hindi training can be beneficial in improving inclusion and practice.

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