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The value of humans in the biological exploration of space

Cockell, Charles (2004). The value of humans in the biological exploration of space. Earth, Moon, and Planets, 94(3-4) pp. 233–243.

URL: http://www.springerlink.com/content/f7r176t36044u2...
DOI (Digital Object Identifier) Link: http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s11038-005-9012-3
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Abstract

Regardless of the discovery of life on Mars, or of “no apparent life” on Mars, the questions that follow will provide a rich future for biological exploration. Extraordinary pattern recognition skills, decadal assimilation of data and experience, and rapid sample acquisition are just three of the characteristics that make humans the best means we have to explore the biological potential of Mars and other planetary surfaces. I make the case that instead of seeing robots as in conflict, or even in support, of human exploration activity, from the point of view of scientific data gathering and analysis, we should view humans as the most powerful robots we have, thus removing the separation that dogs discussions on the exploration of space. The narrow environmental requirements of humans, although imposing constraints on the life support systems required, is more than compensated for by their capabilities in biological exploration. I support this view with an example of the “Christmas present effect,” a simple demonstration of human data and pattern recognition capabilities.

Item Type: Journal Article
ISSN: 0167-9295
Keywords: Life on Mars; human space exploration; robotic space exploration
Academic Unit/Department: Science > Physical Sciences
Interdisciplinary Research Centre: Centre for Earth, Planetary, Space and Astronomical Research (CEPSAR)
Item ID: 8046
Depositing User: Kyra Proctor
Date Deposited: 12 Jun 2007
Last Modified: 02 Sep 2011 09:38
URI: http://oro.open.ac.uk/id/eprint/8046
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