Collective resilience in the disaster recovery period: Emergent social identity and observed social support are associated with collective efficacy, well‐being, and the provision of social support

Ntontis, Evangelos; Drury, John; Amlôt, Richard; Rubin, G. James; Williams, Richard and Saavedra, Patricio (2021). Collective resilience in the disaster recovery period: Emergent social identity and observed social support are associated with collective efficacy, well‐being, and the provision of social support. British Journal of Social Psychology, 60(3) pp. 1075–1095.

DOI: https://doi.org/10.1111/bjso.12434

Abstract

Social support and an emerging sense of community are common in flooding, but postflood group dynamics have not been fully addressed. In the context of a flooded community, we explore how social identification with one’s community emerges and affects well-being, collective efficacy, and social support. Results from a quantitative survey show that social identification was positively associated with common fate, collective efficacy, and well-being through residents’ expectations of support and shared goals. Importantly, social identification and disaster exposure interacted: For flooded residents, observing support was associated with providing support regardless of levels of social identification. For unaffected residents there was no association between observed and provided support, regardless of levels of social identification. However, for indirectly affected residents observing support was associated to providing support but only when they highly identified with the community. We argue that structural factors should also be considered when exploring the effects of group membership.

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