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Understanding computer-related attitudes through an idiographic analysis of gender and self-representations

Oosterwegel, Annerieke; Littleton, Karen and Light, Paul (2004). Understanding computer-related attitudes through an idiographic analysis of gender and self-representations. Learning and instruction, 14(2) pp. 215–233.

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DOI (Digital Object Identifier) Link: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/S0959-4752(03)00093-8
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Abstract

We assessed girls' and boys' attitudes towards computers in general, and their use and enjoyment of computers for specific purposes. In addition, we obtained their self-evaluation against their ideal self, their prototype of a child who would be very good at computer-based tasks, and against their gender stereotypes (both own and other gender). The results showed no gender effects on the nomothetic global attitude scale. Significant gender effects appeared for the specific computer uses and the idiographic measures. Further, positive attitudes towards computers on the global nomothetic measure were related to less gendered idiographic perception of computer use. Confidence in global computer use was related to more gendered perception of computer use. The findings are discussed in terms of the complex ways in which social–cognitive biases are gendered, and the need to differentiate between different forms of computer use.

Item Type: Journal Article
Copyright Holders: 2003 Elsevier Ltd
ISSN: 0959-4752
Academic Unit/Department: Education and Language Studies
Interdisciplinary Research Centre: Centre for Research in Education and Educational Technology (CREET)
Item ID: 775
Depositing User: Users 12 not found.
Date Deposited: 23 May 2006
Last Modified: 20 Jan 2011 18:07
URI: http://oro.open.ac.uk/id/eprint/775
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