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Blockchain, GDPR, and fantasies of data sovereignty

Herian, Robert (2020). Blockchain, GDPR, and fantasies of data sovereignty. Law, Innovation and Technology (Early Access).

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DOI (Digital Object Identifier) Link: https://doi.org/10.1080/17579961.2020.1727094
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Abstract

Like the European Union’s General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR), the broader, mainstream emergence of blockchain technology in the present moment of, what I call, data dysphoria is no accident. It is in part reaction to data dysphoria, and in part exploitation of it, a duality underpinned by the tantalising promise of the prosumer ‘taking control’ of their data and establishing sovereignty over it. Blockchain and GDPR alike aim to resolve ‘problem’/’solution’ matrices with deep roots in a wide variety of global economic, political, social, legal and cultural contexts. This article explores the problem of achieving resolution based on innovation and technology by offering an account of the rise of blockchain and implementation of GDPR within a psycho-political framework, one in which fantasies of taking control are predominant yet highly contestable actualities in the lives of technology users.

Item Type: Journal Item
Copyright Holders: 2020 Informa UK Limited, trading as Taylor & Francis Group
ISSN: 1757-9961
Keywords: Blockchain; data; GDPR; regulation; fantasy; control; sovereignty
Academic Unit/School: Faculty of Business and Law (FBL) > Law
Faculty of Business and Law (FBL)
Item ID: 69445
Depositing User: Robert Herian
Date Deposited: 21 Feb 2020 11:43
Last Modified: 04 Jul 2020 15:33
URI: http://oro.open.ac.uk/id/eprint/69445
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