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Adapting Digital Social Prescribing for Suicide Bereavement Support: The Findings of a Consultation Exercise to Explore the Acceptability of Implementing Digital Social Prescribing within an Existing Postvention Service

Galway, Karen; Forbes, Trisha; Mallon, Sharon; Santin, Olinda; Best, Paul; Neff, Jennifer; Leavey, Gerry and Pitman, Alexandra (2019). Adapting Digital Social Prescribing for Suicide Bereavement Support: The Findings of a Consultation Exercise to Explore the Acceptability of Implementing Digital Social Prescribing within an Existing Postvention Service. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health, 16(22), article no. 4561.

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DOI (Digital Object Identifier) Link: https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph16224561
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Abstract

This paper describes a consultation exercise to explore the acceptability of adapting digital social prescribing (DSP) for suicide bereavement support. Bereavement by suicide increases the risk of suicide and mental health issues. Social prescribing improves connectedness and empowerment and can provide digital outcomes-based reporting to improve the capacity for measuring the effectiveness of interventions. Our aim was to consult on the acceptability and potential value of DSP for addressing the complexities of suicide bereavement support. Our approach was underpinned by implementation science and a co-design ethos. We reviewed the literature and delivered DSP demonstrations as part of our engagement process with commissioners and service providers (marrying evidence and context) and identified key roles for stakeholders (facilitation). Stakeholders contributed to a co-designed workshop to establish consensus on the challenges of providing postvention support. We present findings on eight priority challenges, as well as roles and outcomes for testing the feasibility of DSP for support after suicide. There was a consensus that DSP could potentially improve access, reach, and monitoring of care and support. Stakeholders also recognised the potential for DSP to contribute substantially to the evidence base for postvention support. In conclusion, the consultation exercise identified challenges to facilitating DSP for support after suicide and parameters for feasibility testing to progress to the evaluation of this innovative approach to postvention.

Item Type: Journal Item
Copyright Holders: 2019 The Authors
ISSN: 1660-4601
Project Funding Details:
Funded Project NameProject IDFunding Body
Proximity to Discovery schemeNot SetMRC (Medical Research Council)
Keywords: social prescribing; suicide bereavement; postvention; co-design; complex intervention development; implementation science
Academic Unit/School: Faculty of Wellbeing, Education and Language Studies (WELS) > Health, Wellbeing and Social Care > Health and Social Care
Faculty of Wellbeing, Education and Language Studies (WELS) > Health, Wellbeing and Social Care
Faculty of Wellbeing, Education and Language Studies (WELS)
Item ID: 68171
SWORD Depositor: Jisc Publications-Router
Depositing User: Jisc Publications-Router
Date Deposited: 21 Nov 2019 10:43
Last Modified: 29 Nov 2019 12:05
URI: http://oro.open.ac.uk/id/eprint/68171
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