What does justice mean to black and minority ethnic (BME) victims/survivors of gender-based violence?

Gangoli, Geetanjali; Bates, Lis and Hester, Marianne (2019). What does justice mean to black and minority ethnic (BME) victims/survivors of gender-based violence? Journal of Ethnic and Migration Studies (Early Access).

DOI: https://doi.org/10.1080/1369183X.2019.1650010

Abstract

This paper addresses how ‘justice’ is understood, sought, and experienced by Black and Minority Ethnic (BME) victims/survivors of Gender Based Violence (GBV) within the UK. The key aims of this paper are to explore (a) experiences of GBV for BME victim/survivors, (b) their experiences and perceptions of justice, and (c) factors enabling, or posing barriers to justice, including immigration status. We situate BME women’s experiences and conceptualisations of justice within an ecological approach [Hagemann-White, C., et al. 2010. “Factors at Play in the Perpetration of Violence Against Women, Violence Against Children and Sexual Orientation Violence – A Multi-Level Interactive Model (Part of the Feasibility Study to Assess the Possibilities, Opportunities and Needs to Standardise National Legislation on Gender Violence and Violence Against Children for the European Commission – JLS/2009/D4/01.” Publications of the European Union, Luxembourg] and within Bourdieu’s conceptualisation of ‘social capital’ [1986. “The Forms of Capital.” In Handbook of Theory and Research for the Sociology of Education, edited by J. Richardson, 241–258. Westport, CT: Greenwood]. We found that migrant women lack access to vital aspects of social capital, that make access to justice particularly challenging, and that immigration status poses key barriers in migrant women’s experiences of accessing justice.

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