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Madhouse and the whole thing there

Clarke, Simon (2018). Madhouse and the whole thing there. Qualitative Research in Psychology, 15(2-3) pp. 247–259.

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DOI (Digital Object Identifier) Link: https://doi.org/10.1080/14780887.2018.1429989
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Abstract

This article presents an autoethnography in the form of a short story of the experiences of a mental breakdown, and subsequent involuntary detainment, alongside the experiences of conducting PhD research outside the mainstream of the discipline of psychology. In response to criticisms of narrative approaches that they are methodologically solipsistic and present a socially atomised self, this narrative combines patient medical records with narrative recollections and reflections on the research process from a contemporary perspective. In doing so, the narrative explores and interrogates themes relevant to creative practice in psychological research, including the notion of authenticity, methodological issues of researching personal experience, the problem of subjectivity and, ultimately, the nature of madness and psychological distress, including its nonlinearity and otherness.

Item Type: Journal Item
Copyright Holders: 2018 Taylor & Francis
ISSN: 1478-0887
Keywords: Authenticity; autoethnography; creative practice; madness; mental health services; subjectivity; survivor research
Academic Unit/School: Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (FASS) > Psychology and Counselling > Psychology
Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (FASS) > Psychology and Counselling
Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (FASS)
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Item ID: 66743
Depositing User: Simon Clarke
Date Deposited: 20 Sep 2019 11:46
Last Modified: 04 Oct 2019 11:12
URI: http://oro.open.ac.uk/id/eprint/66743
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