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Learning Design and Service Oriented Architectures:a mutual dependency?

McAndrew, Patrick; Weller, Martin and Barret-Baxendale, Mark (2006). Learning Design and Service Oriented Architectures:a mutual dependency? Journal of Learning Design, 1(3) pp. 51–60.

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Abstract

This paper looks at how the concept of reusability has gained currency in e-learning. Initial attention was focused on reuse of content, but recently attention has focused on reusable software tools and reusable activity structures. The former has led to the proposal of service-oriented architectures, and the latter has seen the development of the Learning Design specification. The authors suggest that there is a mutual dependency between the success of these two approaches, as complex Learning Designs require the ability to call on a range of tools, while remaining technology neutral.
The paper describes a project at the UK Open University, SLeD, which sought to develop a Learning Design player that would utilise the service-oriented approach. This acted both as a means of exploring some of the issues implicit within both approaches and also provided a practical tool. The SLeD system was successfully implemented in a different university, Liverpool Hope, demonstrating some of the principles of re-use.

Item Type: Journal Article
ISSN: 1832-8342
Keywords: Learning Design; service-oriented architecture; virtual learning environments; e-learning; learning management systems
Academic Unit/Department: Institute of Educational Technology
Interdisciplinary Research Centre: Centre for Research in Education and Educational Technology (CREET)
Item ID: 6447
Depositing User: Patrick McAndrew
Date Deposited: 25 Jan 2007
Last Modified: 02 Aug 2016 19:42
URI: http://oro.open.ac.uk/id/eprint/6447
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