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The problem of human subjectivity in Hegel's thought, with particular regard to the relationship between Hegel's Early Theological Writings and his mature philosophy of religion

Hodgson, Michael John Christopher (1998). The problem of human subjectivity in Hegel's thought, with particular regard to the relationship between Hegel's Early Theological Writings and his mature philosophy of religion. MPhil thesis. The Open University.

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Abstract

I seek, in this thesis, by means of a critical exposition and comparison of Hegel’s Early Theological Writings and his mature Lectures on the Philosophy of Religion, to elucidate the relationship between human subjectivity, the self-conscious experience of humanity and the absolute truth which is absolute spirit, God. The apparent divorce of positive biblical narrative from its reflective interpretation is not, it is to be argued, the result of the importing of critical philosophy into the domain of Christian experience. Rather, it is intrinsic to that very experience. The tension between positivity and inwardness, so central a problem to the concerns of the earlier philosophy has, by the time of the mature philosophy of religion, become an opportunity, rather than just a problem, for Christianity. Understanding the continuity between Hegel’s Early Theological Writings and the ostensibly very different speculative system, also enables one to understand the relevance of both to contemporary (and especially religious) experience.

Item Type: Thesis (MPhil)
Copyright Holders: 1998 Michael John Christopher Hodgson
Academic Unit/School: Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (FASS)
Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (FASS) > Social Sciences and Global Studies > Philosophy
Item ID: 63965
Depositing User: ORO Import
Date Deposited: 06 Jan 2020 12:50
Last Modified: 07 Jan 2020 05:29
URI: http://oro.open.ac.uk/id/eprint/63965
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