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Rawls and deliberative democracy

Saward, Michael (2002). Rawls and deliberative democracy. In: Passerin D'Entreves, Maurizio ed. Democracy as public deliberation: new perspectives. Perspectives on Democratization. Manchester, UK, and New York: Manchester University Press, pp. 112–130.

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This chapter offers arguments to support the following conjectures: (1) despite claims by Rawls and some commentators, Rawls is not and cannot be a deliberative democrat; the evidence for this can be gleaned by focussing on various interpretations of the structure of Rawls’ arguments in A Theory of Justice (1972) and Political Liberalism (1993) respectively; and (2) if we ask more directly how the ideal dialogue of the original position might be approximated in real-world conditions, we can reach suggestive conclusions about institutions and deliberative democracy radically different from those reached by Rawls himself.

Item Type: Book Chapter
ISBN: 0-7190-6101-6, 978-0-7190-6101-1
Keywords: John Rawls; deliberative democracy; political theory
Academic Unit/Department: Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (FASS) > Politics, Philosophy, Economics, Development, Geography
Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (FASS)
Interdisciplinary Research Centre: Centre for Citizenship, Identities and Governance (CCIG)
Item ID: 6333
Depositing User: Michael Saward
Date Deposited: 19 Jan 2007
Last Modified: 04 Oct 2016 16:27
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