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Social Jet-Lag in Tertiary Students Following A Modern Curriculum with Few Time-Tabled Contact Hours: A Pilot Study

Leenaars, Cathalijn H. C.; Lucassen, Mathijs; Borger, Nedim; Houben, Ellen and Kalsbeek, Andries (2019). Social Jet-Lag in Tertiary Students Following A Modern Curriculum with Few Time-Tabled Contact Hours: A Pilot Study. Clocks & Sleep, 1(3) pp. 306–318.

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DOI (Digital Object Identifier) Link: https://doi.org/10.3390/clockssleep1030026
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Abstract

Social jet-lag (SJL) impairs academic performance, specifically for late chronotypes faced with early start times. Most modern tertiary educational systems have fewer time-tabled contact hours and consequently fewer early starts, which may limit SJL. We performed a pilot study of SJL in a convenience sample of students from Maastricht University, where problem-based learning (PBL) is implemented throughout the curricula. PBL is a modern curriculum, with only few contact hours and student-driven learning, comprising substantial amounts of self-study. Fifty-two students kept a detailed sleep diary for one week, and completed the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI) and the Epworth Sleepiness Scale (ESS). Participants were divided into early and late sleepers based on a ranking of their reported sleeping times, combined with a single question on their self-reported chronotype. Late sleepers (for brevity: “Owls”; n = 22) had later midpoint-sleep (5:14 ± 0:11 on weekdays; 5:50 ± 0:07 on weekend days) than early sleepers (for brevity: “Larks”; n = 11, 3:21 ± 0:05 on weekdays; 3:41 ± 0:06 on weekend days, F = 10.8, p = 0.003). The difference between the midpoint of sleep on weekdays and weekend days was comparable for Larks and Owls (F = 1.5; p = 0.22). SJL (0:53 ± 0:06, T = 1.4; p = 0.16), total sleep duration (7:58 ± 0:08; p = 0.07), and PSQI score (4.7 ± 0.3, U = 137; p = 0.56) were comparable for Larks and Owls. Average ESS score was higher in Larks (10.7 ± 0.96) than in Owls (7.0 ± 0.72; U = 52; p = 0.007). Within this pilot study of students engaged in a problem-based learning curriculum, Owls have no selective disadvantage compared to Larks concerning sleep.

Item Type: Journal Item
Copyright Holders: 2019 The Authors
Keywords: sleep; nap; PSQI; ESS; social jet-lag; problem-based learning, students, morningness, eveningness
Academic Unit/School: Faculty of Wellbeing, Education and Language Studies (WELS) > Health, Wellbeing and Social Care > Health and Social Care
Faculty of Wellbeing, Education and Language Studies (WELS) > Health, Wellbeing and Social Care
Faculty of Wellbeing, Education and Language Studies (WELS)
Item ID: 62373
Depositing User: Mathijs Lucassen
Date Deposited: 10 Jul 2019 08:38
Last Modified: 15 Nov 2019 17:51
URI: http://oro.open.ac.uk/id/eprint/62373
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