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The private military industry and neoliberal imperialism: Mapping the terrain

Godfrey, Richard; Brewis, Joanna; Grady, Jo and Grocott, Chris (2014). The private military industry and neoliberal imperialism: Mapping the terrain. Organization, 21(1) pp. 106–125.

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DOI (Digital Object Identifier) Link: https://doi.org/10.1177/1350508412470731
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Abstract

Despite the international reach, and increasing global importance, of the free market provision of military and security services—which we label the Private Security Industry (PSI)—management and organization studies has yet to pay significant attention to this industry. Taking up Grey’s (2009) call for scholarship at the boundaries between security studies and organization studies and building on Banerjee’s (2008) treatment of the PSI as a key element in necrocapitalism, in this article we aim to trace the long history of the PSI and argue that it has re-emerged over the last two decades against, and as a result of, a very specific politico-economic backdrop. We then suggest that the PSI operates as a mechanism for neoliberal imperialism; demonstrate its substitution for and supplementing of the state; and count some of the costs of this privatization of war. Finally, we take seriously Hughes’s (2007) thesis of the growth of a new security-industrial complex, and of the intersecting elites who benefit from this phenomenon.

Item Type: Journal Item
Copyright Holders: 2013 The Authors
ISSN: 1461-7323
Keywords: (nation) state; neoliberal imperialism; private security company; private security industry; privatization; security-industrial complex
Academic Unit/School: Faculty of Business and Law (FBL) > Business > Department for Strategy and Marketing
Faculty of Business and Law (FBL) > Business
Faculty of Business and Law (FBL)
Faculty of Business and Law (FBL) > Business > Department for People and Organisations
Item ID: 62351
Depositing User: Richard Godfrey
Date Deposited: 09 Jul 2019 12:53
Last Modified: 09 Jul 2019 21:33
URI: http://oro.open.ac.uk/id/eprint/62351
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