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Co-designing Cards on Social Issues for Creating Educational Games

Myers, Christina; Piccolo, Lara and Collins, Trevor (2018). Co-designing Cards on Social Issues for Creating Educational Games. In: Proceedings of the 32nd International BCS Human Computer Interaction Conference (HCI 2018), 4-6 Jul 2018, Belfast, UK.

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DOI (Digital Object Identifier) Link: https://doi.org/10.14236/ewic/HCI2018.164
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Abstract

This paper presents a participatory methodology to design cards on social issues with the purpose to democratise knowledge among co-designers on the learning content of educational games. Situated on the topic of everyday sexism, the methodology has been developed through an iterative process involving two collaborative workshops, two iterations of card design and a feedback survey. Extracting findings from the workshops and the feedback gathered on the co- designed cards, this paper presents insights that could be used to inform similar studies using cards to inspire and foster reflection on social issues.

Item Type: Conference or Workshop Item
Copyright Holders: 2018 The Authors
Academic Unit/School: Faculty of Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics (STEM) > Knowledge Media Institute (KMi)
Faculty of Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics (STEM)
Research Group: Centre for Research in Computing (CRC)
Item ID: 62141
Depositing User: Christina Myers
Date Deposited: 25 Jun 2019 08:44
Last Modified: 26 Jun 2019 16:41
URI: http://oro.open.ac.uk/id/eprint/62141
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