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Exploring the emotions of distance learning students in an assessed, online, collaborative project

Hilliard, Jake; Kear, Karen; Donelan, Helen and Heaney, Caroline (2019). Exploring the emotions of distance learning students in an assessed, online, collaborative project. In: Connecting through Educational Technology - Proceedings of the European Distance and E-Learning Network 2019 Annual Conference (Volungeviciene, Airina and Szűcs, András eds.), 16-19 Jun 2019, Bruges, Belgium, pp. 251–259.

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Abstract

Previous research has highlighted the importance of emotions of learners in online learning settings. However, much of this research has tended to focus on individual learning situations rather than social learning activities. The exploration of the emotional experiences of distance learners has also received little attention when compared to other student groups (e.g. full-time or blended learning students). As many distance learners are in full- or part-time employment or have other commitments, the emotions experienced and the reasons for these emotions might be greatly different to other student populations. This study investigated these issues by exploring the emotional experiences of distance learners when undertaking an assessed, online, collaborative group project. Self-report data about the emotions experienced and their causes were gathered using a structured diary at six time points during the group activity. Findings revealed that learners experienced a ranged of pleasant and unpleasant emotions before, during and after the collaborative activity. Feelings of satisfaction and relief were the most reported pleasant emotions and feelings of anxiety and frustration were the most frequently reported unpleasant emotions. To conclude this paper, implications for educators are briefly discussed and reflections on using an online diary to explore student emotions are provided.

Item Type: Conference or Workshop Item
Copyright Holders: 2018 European Distance and E-Learning Network and the Authors
ISBN: 615-5511-27-6, 978-615-5511-27-1
Academic Unit/School: Faculty of Wellbeing, Education and Language Studies (WELS) > Learning and Teaching Innovation - Academic
Faculty of Wellbeing, Education and Language Studies (WELS)
Faculty of Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics (STEM) > Computing and Communications
Faculty of Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics (STEM)
Faculty of Wellbeing, Education and Language Studies (WELS) > Education, Childhood, Youth and Sport > Childhood, Youth and Sport > Sport & Fitness
Faculty of Wellbeing, Education and Language Studies (WELS) > Education, Childhood, Youth and Sport > Childhood, Youth and Sport
Faculty of Wellbeing, Education and Language Studies (WELS) > Education, Childhood, Youth and Sport
Research Group: OpenTEL
Item ID: 62057
Depositing User: Jake Hilliard
Date Deposited: 21 Jun 2019 13:16
Last Modified: 23 Aug 2019 16:23
URI: http://oro.open.ac.uk/id/eprint/62057
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