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Cognitive and Heideggarian Approaches to the Study of Emotions/Moods

Sludds, Kevin (2008). Cognitive and Heideggarian Approaches to the Study of Emotions/Moods. MPhil thesis The Open University.

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Abstract

In this study of emotions/moods I tackle the analysis of both analytic and Continental traditions of philosophy to this area. I set out by critically examining the influential hybrid cognitive theory (in particular William Lyons’s causal-evaluative theory), describing its merits but also elucidating a number of fundamental defects that exist in this account. I defend Martin Heidegger’s description of emotion/mood in Being and Time as pre-cognitive and pre-moral from those who attempt to attribute a cognitive dimension to it.

This thesis highlights the significance of connections or bonds in our affective lives at the ontic as well as ontological levels, by examining three specific emotions; grief, guilt and objectless fear. One of its principal achievements is the demonstration that there is much to be gained from both the analytic and Continental traditions of philosophy to emotion/mood analysis and, in particular, to how our understanding of guilt and objectless fear may be deepened when Being and Time is interpreted and read in the manner I describe.

Item Type: Thesis (MPhil)
Copyright Holders: 2008 The Author
Academic Unit/School: Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (FASS) > Social Sciences and Global Studies
Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (FASS) > Social Sciences and Global Studies > Philosophy
Item ID: 61920
Depositing User: ORO Import
Date Deposited: 17 Jun 2019 15:41
Last Modified: 11 Aug 2019 10:27
URI: http://oro.open.ac.uk/id/eprint/61920
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