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You can Believe your Eyes: Measuring Implicit Recognition in a Lineup with Pupillometry.

Elphick, Camilla; Pike, Graham and Hole, Graham (2019). You can Believe your Eyes: Measuring Implicit Recognition in a Lineup with Pupillometry. Psychology, Crime and Law (Early Access).

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DOI (Digital Object Identifier) Link: https://doi.org/10.1080/1068316X.2019.1634196
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Abstract

As pupil size is affected by cognitive processes, we investigated whether it could serve as an independent indicator of target recognition in lineups. Participants saw a simulated crime video, followed by two viewings of either a target-present or target-absent video lineup while pupil size was measured with an eye-tracker. Participants who made correct identifications showed significantly larger pupil sizes when viewing the target compared with distractors. Some participants were uncertain about their choice of face from the lineup, but nevertheless showed pupillary changes when viewing the target, suggesting covert recognition of the target face had occurred. The results suggest that pupillometry might be a useful aid in assessing the accuracy of an eyewitness' identification.

Item Type: Journal Item
ISSN: 1477-2744
Keywords: pupillometry; eyewitness identification; covert recognition; face processing; credibility
Academic Unit/School: Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (FASS) > Psychology and Counselling > Psychology
Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (FASS) > Psychology and Counselling
Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (FASS)
Research Group: Centre for Policing Research and Learning (CPRL)
Item ID: 61736
Depositing User: Graham Pike
Date Deposited: 11 Jun 2019 12:58
Last Modified: 06 Aug 2019 15:28
URI: http://oro.open.ac.uk/id/eprint/61736
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