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Aeolian abrasion of rocks as a mechanism to produce methane in the Martian atmosphere

Safi, E.; Telling, J.; Parnell, J.; Chojnacki, M.; Patel, M.R.; Realff, J.; Blamey, N. J. F.; Payler, S.; Cockell, C. S.; Davies, L.; Boothroyd, I. M.; Worrall, F. and Wadham, J. L. (2019). Aeolian abrasion of rocks as a mechanism to produce methane in the Martian atmosphere. Nature Scientific Reports, 9(1), article no. 8229.

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DOI (Digital Object Identifier) Link: https://doi.org/10.1038/s41598-019-44616-2
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Abstract

Seasonal changes in methane background levels and methane spikes have been detected in situ a metre above the Martian surface, and larger methane plumes detected via ground-based remote sensing, however their origin have not yet been adequately explained. Proposed methane sources include the UV irradiation of meteoritic-derived organic matter, hydrothermal reactions with olivine, organic breakdown via meteoroid impact, release from gas hydrates, biological production, or the release of methane from fluid inclusions in basalt during aeolian erosion. Here we quantify for the first time the potential importance of aeolian abrasion as a mechanism for releasing trapped methane from within rocks, by coupling estimates of present day surface wind abrasion with the methane contents of a variety of Martian meteorites, analogue terrestrial basalts and analogue terrestrial sedimentary rocks. We demonstrate that the abrasion of basalt under present day Martian rates of aeolian erosion is highly unlikely to produce detectable changes in methane concentrations in the atmosphere. We further show that, although there is a greater potential for methane production from the aeolian abrasion of certain sedimentary rocks, to produce the magnitude of methane concentrations analysed by the Curiosity rover they would have to contain methane in similar concentrations as economic reserved of biogenic/thermogenic deposits on Earth. Therefore we suggest that aeolian abrasion is an unlikely origin of the methane detected in the Martian atmosphere, and that other methane sources are required.

Item Type: Journal Item
Copyright Holders: 2019 The Authors
ISSN: 2045-2322
Project Funding Details:
Funded Project NameProject IDFunding Body
Modelling and retrieval of martian dust, ice and ozone from ExoMars NOMAD dataST/P001262/1UKSA UK Space Agency
Science operations for UVIS and CaSSIS on the ExoMars Trace Gas OrbiterST/R005761/1UKSA UK Space Agency
Surface/atmosphere interactions from above and below.ST/S00145X/1UKSA UK Space Agency
Academic Unit/School: Faculty of Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics (STEM) > Physical Sciences
Faculty of Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics (STEM)
Research Group: Space
Item ID: 61604
Depositing User: Manish Patel
Date Deposited: 04 Jun 2019 08:26
Last Modified: 10 Jun 2019 16:31
URI: http://oro.open.ac.uk/id/eprint/61604
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