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520,000 years of environmental change in West Africa

Miller, Charlotte S. (2014). 520,000 years of environmental change in West Africa. PhD thesis The Open University.

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Abstract

Global temperatures are predicted to rise by 2-2.5°C by 2065, profoundly affecting the Earth's environment. The response of ecosystems to past climate fluctuations can inform on how systems will respond in the future. This thesis focuses on Quaternary environmental changes in West Africa, a region important because of its high ecological value and role in the global carbon cycle. In 2004, the International Continental Drilling Program recovered c. 291 m of sediments spanning the last c. 1 Myr from Lake Bosumtwi (Ghana). Pollen, charcoal and nitrogen isotopes (ᵟ15N) were analysed from the most recent c. 150m (c. 520 kyr). The latitudinal position and long duration of this core makes it unique for understanding West African monsoon dynamics and vegetation change. To aid characterisation of the Bosumtwi pollen succession, an atlas of present-day pollen was constructed for 364 pollen and spore taxa. The pollen record from Bosumtwi reveals dynamic vegetation change over the last c. 520 kyr, characterized by eleven biome shifts between savannah and forest. Savannah vegetation is dominated by Poaceae (>55%) associated with Cyperaceae, Chenopodiaceae-Amaranthaceae and Caryophyllaceae. Forest vegetation is palynologically diverse, but broadly characterised by Moraceae, Celtis, Uapaca, Macaranga and Trema. Low ᵟ15N values correspond to forest expansion and these are driven by high lake levels. The timescale indicates that the six periods of forest expansion correspond to global interglacial periods. The record indicates that the wettest climate occurred during the Holocene, and the driest during Marine Isotope Stage 7. The vegetation and ᵟ15N records show a strong response to glacial-interglacial variability between 520- 320 kyr and 130- 0 kyr. Between 320- 130 kyr there is a weaker response to glacial-interglacial cycles probably related to high eccentricity during the peak of the 400-kyr component of eccentricity, with high eccentricity resulting in greater seasonality and ultimately drier conditions.

Item Type: Thesis (PhD)
Copyright Holders: 2014 The Author
Academic Unit/School: Faculty of Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics (STEM) > Environment, Earth and Ecosystem Sciences
Research Group: OpenSpace Research Centre (OSRC)
Item ID: 61180
Depositing User: ORO Import
Date Deposited: 14 May 2019 14:23
Last Modified: 06 Jul 2019 18:37
URI: http://oro.open.ac.uk/id/eprint/61180
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