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Pervasiveness of a Programming Paradigm: Questions Concerning an Object-oriented Approach

Woodman, Mark; Holland, Simon and Price, Blaine Pervasiveness of a Programming Paradigm: Questions Concerning an Object-oriented Approach. In: Proceedings of the Second All Ireland Conference on the Teaching of Computing.

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Abstract

This paper outlines the way in which a radical syllabus is being designed for the new introductory computing course being offered by the Open University from 1997. It describes how a decision to teach object-oriented programming has resulted in the associated concepts and paradigm pervading the syllabus. The result is a novel ped- agogy by which students take considerable time to begin conventional programming. The context for this innovatory approach is a very large student population (3,500 per year), a long lead time for developing courses, and a need to remain current six or seven years after conception. The background and the emerging syllabus are both summarized and questions concerning the teaching of the object-oriented approach are raised.

Item Type: Conference or Workshop Item
Copyright Holders: 1994 The Authors
Academic Unit/School: Faculty of Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics (STEM) > Computing and Communications
Faculty of Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics (STEM)
Item ID: 59795
Depositing User: Simon Holland
Date Deposited: 01 Apr 2019 09:51
Last Modified: 16 Apr 2019 13:13
URI: http://oro.open.ac.uk/id/eprint/59795
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