The Open UniversitySkip to content
 

Networking and Technological Learning in Small and Medium Scale Manufacturing Enterprises in Zimbabwe

Chipika, Stephen (2004). Networking and Technological Learning in Small and Medium Scale Manufacturing Enterprises in Zimbabwe. PhD thesis The Open University.

Full text available as:
[img]
Preview
PDF (Version of Record) - Requires a PDF viewer such as GSview, Xpdf or Adobe Acrobat Reader
Download (18MB) | Preview
Google Scholar: Look up in Google Scholar

Abstract

The overall aim of this thesis is to understand the relationship between technological learning and networking for small and medium enterprises (SMEs) engaged in manufacturing in Zimbabwe. This understanding is vital in order to facilitate a more purposeful mainstreaming of manufacturing SMEs into the national economy. The implications of the relationship between technological learning and networking are noted in the analyses, conclusions drawn and recommendations made for the strengthening of the development of manufacturing SMEs in the country.

A combination of quantitative and qualitative methods are used to analyse largely primary data collected principally but not exclusively from Harare. The quantitative data are analysed by applying progressive statistical analysis which involves the use of scatterplot, linear correlation coefficient, Chi-square test and regression analysis. Case study analysis which focuses on four firms with varying characteristics is used to develop an in-depth understanding of the association between technological learning and networking.

The research findings generally lend support to the hypothesis that 'small and medium scale light engineering firms that are strongly networked have a greater level of technological leaming than poorly networked firms'. However, there are also qualifiers to this broad hypothesis, of which two are paramount. Firstly, in order to learn from networks a firm must know how to learn. Secondly, while customer networks are consistently of high significance to firms, the same cannot be said of networks involving enterprise support organisations (ESOs). These qualifiers have important policy implications for the type of support that is offered to SMEs in Zimbabwe.

Item Type: Thesis (PhD)
Copyright Holders: 2004 The Author
Academic Unit/School: Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (FASS) > Social Sciences and Global Studies
Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (FASS) > Social Sciences and Global Studies > Development
Item ID: 59541
Depositing User: ORO Import
Date Deposited: 07 Mar 2019 11:07
Last Modified: 12 Aug 2019 16:21
URI: http://oro.open.ac.uk/id/eprint/59541
Share this page:

Download history for this item

These details should be considered as only a guide to the number of downloads performed manually. Algorithmic methods have been applied in an attempt to remove automated downloads from the displayed statistics but no guarantee can be made as to the accuracy of the figures.

Actions (login may be required)

Policies | Disclaimer

© The Open University   contact the OU