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Black women's activism and organisation in public health - struggles and strategies for better health and wellbeing

Douglas, Jenny (2019). Black women's activism and organisation in public health - struggles and strategies for better health and wellbeing. Caribbean Review of Gender Studies(13) pp. 51–68.

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Abstract

Using Avtar Brah's concept of 'diaspora space', this paper argues that Black women in the UK have organised in diaspora space to challenge inequities in health and develop strategies to improve health outcomes for black communities. The paper explores the post-war contribution of Black women nurses in the UK to public health, both as activists for change and as organisers of change. The paper concludes by exploring the confluences and synergies between the concept of ‘diaspora space’ and that of ‘(post) diaspora’ as espoused by Scafe (2018). The paper argues that both concepts are useful for understanding the ways in which Black women have used their agency to challenge health inequities.

Item Type: Journal Item
ISSN: 1995-1108
Extra Information: This item is relevant to the OU Black Women's Health & Wellbeing Research Network: www.open.ac.uk/black-womens-health-and-wellbeing
Keywords: black women; Caribbean; health; activism; intersectionality
Academic Unit/School: Faculty of Wellbeing, Education and Language Studies (WELS) > Health, Wellbeing and Social Care
Faculty of Wellbeing, Education and Language Studies (WELS)
Item ID: 59460
Depositing User: Jenny Douglas
Date Deposited: 05 Mar 2019 11:44
Last Modified: 17 Jul 2019 02:10
URI: http://oro.open.ac.uk/id/eprint/59460
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