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Deglacial seasonal and sub-seasonal diatom record from Palmer Deep, Antarctica

Maddison, Eleanor; Pike, Jennifer; Leventer, Amy and Domack, Eugene W. (2005). Deglacial seasonal and sub-seasonal diatom record from Palmer Deep, Antarctica. Journal of Quaternary Science, 20(5) pp. 435–446.

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The Antarctic Peninsula is one of the most sensitive regions of Antarctica to climate change. Here, ecological and cryospheric systems respond rapidly to climate fluctuations. A 4.4m thick laminated diatom ooze deposited during the last deglaciation is examined from a marine sediment core (ODP Site 1098) recovered from Basin I, Palmer Deep, western Antarctic Peninsula. This deglacial laminated interval was deposited directly over a glaciomarine diamict, hence during a globally recognised period of rapid climate change. The ultra-high-resolution deglacial record is analysed using SEM backscattered electron imagery and secondary electron imagery. Laminated to thinly bedded orange-brown diatom ooze (near monogeneric Hyalochaete Chaetoceros spp. resting spores)alternates with blue-grey terrigenous sediments (open water diatom species). These discrete laminae are interpreted as austral spring and summer signals respectively, with negligible winter deposition. Sub-seasonal sub-laminae are observed repeatedly through the summer laminae, suggesting variations in shelf waters throughout the summer. Tidal cycles, high storm intensities and/or intrusion of Circumpolar Deep Water onto the continental shelf introduced conditions which enhanced specific species productivity through the season.

Item Type: Journal Article
ISSN: 0267-8179
Keywords: Antarctic Peninsula; diatoms; laminated sediments; palaeoceanography; Palmer Deep
Academic Unit/Department: Science > Environment, Earth and Ecosystems
Item ID: 5915
Depositing User: Eleanor Maddison
Date Deposited: 17 Nov 2006
Last Modified: 02 Dec 2010 19:55
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