The Open UniversitySkip to content
 

Luxemburg and the Balance of Power in the 21st Century

Szymborska, Hanna K. (2016). Luxemburg and the Balance of Power in the 21st Century. In: Dellheim, Judith and Wolff, Frieder Otto eds. Rosa Luxemburg: A Permanent Challenge for Political Economy. Luxemburg International Studies on Political Economy. London: Palgrave Macmillan, pp. 169–183.

DOI (Digital Object Identifier) Link: https://doi.org/10.1057/978-1-137-60108-7_7
Google Scholar: Look up in Google Scholar

Abstract

The chapter discusses the relevance of Rosa Luxemburg’s ideas contained in her Accumulation of Capital in understanding the shift in the balance of power inspired by the transformation of financial sectors from the second half of the 20th century until recent times. Luxemburg’s theory of the necessity of non-capitalist strata for capitalist development is reinterpreted to understand the emergent changes in power relations. It is argued that deepening social disparities have constituted a precondition for the establishment of finance-led capitalism in the last decades, which can be interpreted as parallel to Rosa Luxemburg’s theory of the necessity of non-capitalist accumulation serving as a field of exploitation for the development of capitalism.

Item Type: Book Section
Copyright Holders: 2016 The Author
ISBN: 1-137-60107-8, 978-1-137-60107-0
Keywords: political economy; history of economic thought; inequality
Academic Unit/School: Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (FASS) > Social Sciences and Global Studies > Economics
Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (FASS) > Social Sciences and Global Studies
Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (FASS)
Research Group: International Development & Inclusive Innovation
Innovation, Knowledge & Development research centre (IKD)
Item ID: 58927
Depositing User: Hanna Szymborska
Date Deposited: 04 Feb 2019 10:31
Last Modified: 06 Aug 2019 08:54
URI: http://oro.open.ac.uk/id/eprint/58927
Share this page:

Metrics

Altmetrics from Altmetric

Citations from Dimensions

Actions (login may be required)

Policies | Disclaimer

© The Open University   contact the OU