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Is the Professionalisation of Adult Basic Skills Practice Possible, Desirable or Inevitable?

Dennis, Carol (2010). Is the Professionalisation of Adult Basic Skills Practice Possible, Desirable or Inevitable? Literacy and Numeracy Studies, 18(2) pp. 26–42.

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DOI (Digital Object Identifier) Link: https://doi.org/10.5130/lns.v18i2.1896
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Abstract

This paper explores the meaning and implications of a policy-driven professionalisation of adult basic skills practice. Written amidst competing theoretical conceptualisations of professionalism, the paper focuses on a particular policy moment in Adult Language, Literacy and Numeracy (ALLN) practice in England: Skills for Life. The paper argues that the possibility of implementation of this policy is limited. The policy is filtered through the fragmented nature of the field, the embeddedness of literacy and what this paper calls an 'anti-professional' stance of ALLN practice. For policy makers, professionalisation is desirable, and its impact is far-reaching. It enables control of a key aspect of the service sector implicated in the supply of flexi-workers required by a globalised economy. In discussing the inevitability of professionalisation the paper draws on a small-scale research project to locate a space for the professional imagination, a space in which ALLN practitioners express motivations at odds with policy imperatives and enact professionalisation in ways that arguably hijack the momentum and resource that the policy provides.

Item Type: Journal Item
ISSN: 1839-2903
Keywords: Literacy; Adult Language, Literacy and Numeracy (ALLN),Skills for Life, professionalisation, Adult basic Skills, Policy Studies,
Academic Unit/School: Faculty of Wellbeing, Education and Language Studies (WELS) > Education, Childhood, Youth and Sport > Education
Faculty of Wellbeing, Education and Language Studies (WELS) > Education, Childhood, Youth and Sport
Faculty of Wellbeing, Education and Language Studies (WELS)
Research Group: Centre for Research in Education and Educational Technology (CREET)
Item ID: 58615
Depositing User: Carol Azumah Dennis
Date Deposited: 14 Jan 2019 11:53
Last Modified: 29 Mar 2019 12:14
URI: http://oro.open.ac.uk/id/eprint/58615
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