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Cannabidiol Affects Extracellular Vesicle Release, miR21 and miR126, and Reduces Prohibitin Protein in Glioblastoma Multiforme Cells

Kosgodage, Uchini S.; Uysal-Onganer, Pinar; MacLatchy, Amy; Mould, Rhys; Nunn, Alistair V.; Guy, Geoffrey W.; Kraev, Igor; Chatterton, Nicholas P.; Thomas, E. Louise; Inal, Jameel M.; Bell, Jimmy D. and Lange, Sigrun (2019). Cannabidiol Affects Extracellular Vesicle Release, miR21 and miR126, and Reduces Prohibitin Protein in Glioblastoma Multiforme Cells. Translational Oncology, 12(3) pp. 513–522.

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DOI (Digital Object Identifier) Link: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.tranon.2018.12.004
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Abstract

Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) is the most common and aggressive form of primary malignant brain tumor in adults, with poor prognosis. Extracellular vesicles (EVs) are key-mediators for cellular communication through transfer of proteins and genetic material. Cancers, such as GBM, use EV release for drug-efflux, pro-oncogenic signaling, invasion and immunosuppression; thus the modulation of EV release and cargo is of considerable clinical relevance. As EV-inhibitors have been shown to increase sensitivity of cancer cells to chemotherapy, and we recently showed that cannabidiol (CBD) is such an EV-modulator, we investigated whether CBD affects EV profile in GBM cells in the presence and absence of temozolomide (TMZ). Compared to controls, CBD-treated cells released EVs containing lower levels of pro-oncogenic miR21 and increased levels of anti-oncogenic miR126; these effects were greater than with TMZ alone. In addition, prohibitin (PHB), a multifunctional protein with mitochondrial protective properties and chemoresistant functions, was reduced in GBM cells following 1 h CBD treatment. This data suggests that CBD may, via modulation of EVs and PHB, act as an adjunct to enhance treatment efficacy in GBM, supporting evidence for efficacy of cannabinoids in GBM.

Item Type: Journal Item
ISSN: 1936-5233
Academic Unit/School: Faculty of Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics (STEM)
Faculty of Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics (STEM) > Life, Health and Chemical Sciences
Item ID: 58493
Depositing User: ORO Import
Date Deposited: 03 Jan 2019 12:26
Last Modified: 04 May 2019 06:51
URI: http://oro.open.ac.uk/id/eprint/58493
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