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Brief history of burnout

Samra, Rajvinder (2018). Brief history of burnout. BMJ, 363, article no. k5268.

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DOI (Digital Object Identifier) Link: https://doi.org/10.1136/bmj.k5268
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Abstract

The coining of the term ‘burnout’ in a clinical sense is typically attributed (1) to Freudenberger in 1974 (2), where he described it as particularly pertinent to caring professionals. More than forty years later, burnout is still conceptualised as uniquely affecting those in emotionally demanding professional roles (3). However, one of the first documented reports of workplace burnout more generally shows it occurring in individuals without occupational caring responsibilities (4). In 1971, three years before Freudenberger’s description (2), US air traffic controllers were commonly reporting “vocational ‘burn out,’ a form of exhaustion, which is manifested in a decline in quantity and quality of work production” (4). There are a number of important, and overlooked, parallels between burnout in air traffic controllers and physicians reporting burnout today that can inform our current approaches to addressing this phenomenon.

Item Type: Journal Item
Copyright Holders: 2018 The Author
ISSN: 1756-1833
Academic Unit/School: Faculty of Wellbeing, Education and Language Studies (WELS) > Health, Wellbeing and Social Care > Health and Social Care
Faculty of Wellbeing, Education and Language Studies (WELS) > Health, Wellbeing and Social Care
Faculty of Wellbeing, Education and Language Studies (WELS)
Research Group: Health and Wellbeing PRA (Priority Research Area)
Item ID: 58472
Depositing User: Rajvinder Samra
Date Deposited: 04 Jan 2019 10:29
Last Modified: 16 Nov 2019 22:48
URI: http://oro.open.ac.uk/id/eprint/58472
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