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Moving from the terminology debate to a transdisciplinary understanding of the problem: Commentary on: Ten myths about work addiction (Griffiths et al., 2018)

Quinones, Cristina (2018). Moving from the terminology debate to a transdisciplinary understanding of the problem: Commentary on: Ten myths about work addiction (Griffiths et al., 2018). Journal of Behavioral Addictions, 74(4) pp. 880–883.

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DOI (Digital Object Identifier) Link: https://doi.org/10.1556/2006.7.2018.121
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Abstract

This commentary considers a recent debate paper which presents and counters 10 work addiction myths. I reflect upon the proposal to move the field forward by distinguishing between, work addiction, which denotes a clinical phenomenon; and workaholism, a term used by the occupational psychology literature with little agreement about its defining dimensions beyond working compulsively. Rather than choosing between these two terms, I argue that addiction experts should lead a transdisciplinary integration of findings from studies where participants report both working compulsively and experiencing significant conflict. I also stress the importance of understanding the macro factors underlying this particular addiction.

Item Type: Journal Item
Copyright Holders: 2018 Cristina Quinones
ISSN: 2063-5303
Keywords: work addiction; workaholism; clinical manifestations; critical approach; transdisciplinary
Academic Unit/School: Faculty of Business and Law (FBL) > Business > Department for People and Organisations
Faculty of Business and Law (FBL) > Business
Faculty of Business and Law (FBL)
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Item ID: 58429
SWORD Depositor: Jisc Publications-Router
Depositing User: Jisc Publications-Router
Date Deposited: 03 Jan 2019 10:07
Last Modified: 27 Sep 2019 16:16
URI: http://oro.open.ac.uk/id/eprint/58429
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