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Conspiracy Theories and the Study of Alternative and Emergent Religions

Robertson, David G. (2015). Conspiracy Theories and the Study of Alternative and Emergent Religions. Nova Religio: The Journal of Alternative and Emergent Religions, 19(2) pp. 5–16.

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DOI (Digital Object Identifier) Link: https://doi.org/10.1525/nr.2015.19.2.5
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Abstract

This introduction addresses a number of approaches to the emerging field of the study of conspiracy theories and new and alternative religions. Scholars can examine how certain religious groups have been the subject of conspiracy narratives created by the wider culture, and how conspiracy narratives are mobilized within religious groups such as Aum Shinrikyo, Scientology or others. Moreover, we can fruitfully examine secular conspiracy theories through ideas typically applied to religions, such as theodicy, millenarianism, and esoteric claims to higher knowledge. Most studies assume that conspiracy theories indicate pathology—paranoia or simply stupidity. Increasingly however, scholars have begun to interpret the term “conspiracy theory” as operating polemically to stigmatize certain beliefs and ideas. The field therefore offers a microcosm of broader trends in the interplay of knowledge and power. The study of both new and emergent religions and conspiracy theories comes of age only when we cease to think of them as necessarily deviant and irrational.

Item Type: Journal Item
Copyright Holders: 2015 The Regents of the University of California
ISSN: 1092-6690
Keywords: conspiracy theories; millenarianism; stigmatized knowledge
Academic Unit/School: Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (FASS) > Social Sciences and Global Studies > Religious Studies
Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (FASS) > Social Sciences and Global Studies
Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (FASS)
Item ID: 58154
Depositing User: David Robertson
Date Deposited: 06 Dec 2018 10:32
Last Modified: 12 Jun 2020 10:12
URI: http://oro.open.ac.uk/id/eprint/58154
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