The Open UniversitySkip to content
 

Stress in firefighters: situations, reactions and interactions

Docherty, Robert Walker (1992). Stress in firefighters: situations, reactions and interactions. PhD thesis The Open University.

Full text available as:
[img]
Preview
PDF (Version of Record) - Requires a PDF viewer such as GSview, Xpdf or Adobe Acrobat Reader
Download (33MB) | Preview
Google Scholar: Look up in Google Scholar

Abstract

A series of studies were carried out to determine how experience and training in firefighters affected their reactions to situations they encountered at work.

The first three studies used quantitative and qualitative techniques to identify those situations which firefighters found to be significant to them in terms of varying stressfulness. One of these studies sampled firefighters who attended the Manchester Air Disaster.

The final two studies used the situations identified by the initial studies and extended the methodology of Payne, Fineman & Jackson (1982) in the development of a measure of work anxiety within a paradigm of interaction between situations and individual reactions.

Evidence for the interactionist position was found in both studies although subject's reactions to situations seemed to be situationally driven. Strength of reactions to situations did reduce over time due to training, experience, occupational group homogeneity and the learning of coping strategies.

As a result of these studies an extended model of the interactionist position was proposed as well as some suggestions for future research.

Item Type: Thesis (PhD)
Copyright Holders: 1991 The Author
Academic Unit/School: Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (FASS) > Psychology and Counselling
Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (FASS) > Psychology and Counselling > Psychology
Item ID: 57321
Depositing User: ORO Import
Date Deposited: 25 Oct 2018 12:36
Last Modified: 09 Aug 2019 04:38
URI: http://oro.open.ac.uk/id/eprint/57321
Share this page:

Download history for this item

These details should be considered as only a guide to the number of downloads performed manually. Algorithmic methods have been applied in an attempt to remove automated downloads from the displayed statistics but no guarantee can be made as to the accuracy of the figures.

Actions (login may be required)

Policies | Disclaimer

© The Open University   contact the OU