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Investigating Sources of Mercury's Crustal Magnetic Field: Further Mapping of MESSENGER Magnetometer Data

Hood, L. L.; Oliveira, J. S.; Galluzzi, V. and Rothery, D. A. (2018). Investigating Sources of Mercury's Crustal Magnetic Field: Further Mapping of MESSENGER Magnetometer Data. Journal of Geophysical Research: Planets, 123(10) pp. 2647–2666.

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DOI (Digital Object Identifier) Link: https://doi.org/10.1029/2018je005683
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Abstract

106 low‐altitude passes of magnetometer data from the last two months of the MESSENGER mission have been applied to produce a map of the crustal magnetic field at a constant altitude of 40 km covering latitudes of 35° ‐75° N and longitudes of 270° ‐90° E. Some anomalies correlate significantly with impact basins/craters (e.g., Rustaveli and Vyasa) while other basins/craters have no obvious anomalies. A possible interpretation that is consistent with lunar evidence is that some impactors delivered more ferromagnetic Fe‐Ni metal to the interior subsurfaces and ejecta fields of the craters/basins that they produced. The amount of metallic iron that could plausibly be delivered is limited by the diameter and mass of an impactor that would yield a crater with observed diameters (e.g., 200 km for Rustaveli). This in turn limits the maximum amplitude of anomalies that could be induced by impactor‐added iron in the present‐day Mercury global field to relatively low values. It is therefore concluded that if impactor‐added iron is the source of the observed crater‐associated anomalies, then they must be almost entirely a consequence of ancient remanent magnetization. A broad magnetic anomaly occurs over the northern rise, a topographically high region with an associated strong free air gravity anomaly. A possible interpretation of the latter anomaly is that an early major impact preconditioned the region for a later mantle uplift event.

Item Type: Journal Item
Copyright Holders: 2018 American Geophysical Union
ISSN: 2169-9100
Academic Unit/School: Faculty of Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics (STEM) > Physical Sciences
Faculty of Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics (STEM)
Item ID: 56522
SWORD Depositor: Jisc Publications-Router
Depositing User: Jisc Publications-Router
Date Deposited: 11 Sep 2018 13:49
Last Modified: 21 May 2019 06:59
URI: http://oro.open.ac.uk/id/eprint/56522
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