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Large Families of Ternary Sequences with Aperiodic Zero Correlation Zone Sequences for a Multi-Carrier DS-CDMA System

Donelan, H. and O'Farrell, T. (2002). Large Families of Ternary Sequences with Aperiodic Zero Correlation Zone Sequences for a Multi-Carrier DS-CDMA System. In: 13th IEEE International Symposium on Personal, Indoor and Mobile Radio Communications, 15-18 Sept 2002, Lisboa, Portugal.

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Abstract

A new method for generating families of ternary spreading sequences is presented. The sequences have aperiodic zero correlation zones and large families are created for a specific sequence length. The sequences are proposed as spreading sequences to provide high capacity and cancel multipath and multiple access interference (MAI) in a single carrier (SC) or multi-carrier (MC) direct-spread code division multiple access (DS-CDMA) system. A Multi-carrier DS-CDMA system is simulated that employs the new sequences as spreading sequences in a multipath channel. Bit error rates (BER) and frame error rates (FER) for a range of Eb/No values are presented and it is demonstrated that the proposed sequences improve the BER and FER performance when used in place of masked Walsh Codes for the frequency selective fading channel evaluated, when a single correlator receiver is used on each sub-carrier.

Item Type: Conference Item
Keywords: Ternary sequences; multicarrier DS-CDMA; zero correlation zones
Academic Unit/Department: Faculty of Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics (STEM) > Computing and Communications
Faculty of Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics (STEM)
Item ID: 5626
Depositing User: Helen Donelan
Date Deposited: 23 Oct 2006
Last Modified: 03 Aug 2016 17:44
URI: http://oro.open.ac.uk/id/eprint/5626
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