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Can distortions in agriculture support structural transformation? The case of Uzbekistan

Lombardozzi, Lorena (2019). Can distortions in agriculture support structural transformation? The case of Uzbekistan. Post-Communist Economies, 31(1) pp. 52–74.

DOI (Digital Object Identifier) Link: https://doi.org/10.1080/14631377.2018.1458486
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Abstract

The agricultural sector plays a strategic role in the development process of a country. However, the tools used to trigger economic development are objects of controversy in theory and practice. While neoclassical theory contends that state interventions and protectionism create inefficiencies and sub-optimal allocation of resources, heterodox authors argue that those measures can be instrumental in fostering growth. Uzbekistan has applied heterodox distortive measures in agriculture. This paper investigates the implications of those distortions for the Uzbek economy. I argue that state interventions in agriculture, through surplus extraction and economies of scale, have facilitated investments in added-value industries, driving national structural transformation.

Item Type: Journal Item
Copyright Holders: 2018 Informa UK Limited, trading as Taylor & Francis Group
ISSN: 1465-3958
Project Funding Details:
Funded Project NameProject IDFunding Body
Standard Charted Scholarships for post-graduate studies in EconomicsNot SetSOAS, University of London
Keywords: Agricultural development; taxation; transformation; Uzbekistan; commodity value chain; growth
Academic Unit/School: Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (FASS) > Social Sciences and Global Studies > Economics
Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (FASS) > Social Sciences and Global Studies
Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (FASS)
Research Group: Innovation, Knowledge & Development research centre (IKD)
Item ID: 54909
Depositing User: Lorena Lombardozzi
Date Deposited: 03 May 2018 08:51
Last Modified: 06 Aug 2019 08:52
URI: http://oro.open.ac.uk/id/eprint/54909
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