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Teaching mathematics to children with emotional and behavioural difficulties : the development of practice as a personal journey

Hogan, Susan Elizabeth (2003). Teaching mathematics to children with emotional and behavioural difficulties : the development of practice as a personal journey. PhD thesis The Open University.

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Abstract

Children with emotional and behavioural difficulties (EBD) are often characterised as 'challenging' and 'unteachable'. The purpose of this thesis is to demonstrate how one teacher's personal enquiry into her practice reveals an alternative perspective on teaching mathematics to children with EBD. If it is accepted that the mathematics classroom is challenging to the child then the role of the mathematics teacher becomes one of developing a trusting relationship with the child based on the teacher's use of empathy and 'being there'. It is important for the mathematics teacher to take risks in using mathematics to overcome the emotional and behavioural difficulties of the child. The message is that researching one's own practice is a valuable exercise for any practitioner.

Item Type: Thesis (PhD)
Copyright Holders: 2003 The Author
Academic Unit/School: Faculty of Wellbeing, Education and Language Studies (WELS) > Education, Childhood, Youth and Sport
Item ID: 54558
Depositing User: ORO Import
Date Deposited: 18 Apr 2018 10:43
Last Modified: 08 Dec 2018 02:39
URI: http://oro.open.ac.uk/id/eprint/54558
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