Collecting Art in the Italian Renaissance Court: Objects and Exchanges

Clark, Leah (2018). Collecting Art in the Italian Renaissance Court: Objects and Exchanges. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.

URL: http://www.cambridge.org/9781108427722

Abstract

In this book, Leah R. Clark examines collecting practices across the Italian Renaissance courts, exploring the circulation, exchange, collection, and display of objects. Rather than focusing on patronage strategies or the political power of individual collectors, she uses the objects themselves to elucidate the dynamic relationships formed through their exchange. Her study brings forward the mechanisms that structured relations within the court, and most importantly, also with individuals, representations, and spaces outside the court. The book examines the courts of Italy through the wide variety of objects – statues, paintings, jewellery, furniture, and heraldry – that were valued for their subject matter, material forms, histories, and social functions. As Clark shows, the late fifteenth-century Italian court can be located not only in the body of the prince but also in the objects that constituted symbolic practices, initiated political dialogues, caused rifts, created memories, and formed associations.

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About

  • Item ORO ID
  • 54129
  • Item Type
  • Book
  • ISBN
  • 1-108-42772-3, 978-1-108-42772-2
  • Project Funding Details
  • Funded Project NameProject IDFunding Body
    Value and Symbolic PracticesNot SetSSHRC (Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council of Canada)
    Italian Embassy Long Term ScholarshipNot SetItalian Embassy
    Image fees and copyrightNot SetThe Open University
  • Keywords
  • Renaissance; court; Italy; collecting: art; art history; history; economics; exchange; history of collecting; court culture; early modern history; merchant bankers; material culture; rulers; Aragonese; Este; Medici; Sforza; Strozzi; Florence; Naples; Ferrara; Milan; gift exchange; gifts; economic history; merchants; Renaissance court; studiolo; objects; object biographies; thing theory
  • Academic Unit or School
  • Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (FASS) > Arts and Humanities > Art History
    Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (FASS) > Arts and Humanities
    Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (FASS)
  • Copyright Holders
  • © 2018 The Author
  • Depositing User
  • Leah Clark

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