The impact of daily emotional demands, job resources and emotional effort on intensive internet use during and after work

Quinones, Cristina and Griffiths, Mark D. (2017). The impact of daily emotional demands, job resources and emotional effort on intensive internet use during and after work. Computers in Human Behavior, 76 pp. 561–575.

DOI: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.chb.2017.07.020

Abstract

Information Communication Technologies (ICTs) have become a popular leisure platform. Psychological recovery during leisure time is vital to replenish resources spent at work. The present diary study comprised a sample of employees with high exposure to emotional demands and integrates the Job Demands-Resources (JD-R) and addiction literature to examine whether engaging intensively on the internet may be conductive or inhibitor to psychological recovery. A total of 84 employees completed four consecutive daily diary survey three times a day comprising 880 data points. Multilevel analysis was used and results confirmed that intensive internet use was higher on days of high demands and low resources for those with higher baseline levels of compulsive use, and intensive use was weaker on days of high resources. Additionally, intensive use increased recovery experience before bed and the morning after only low compulsive users. The opposite was true for more compulsive users. These findings contribute to both JD-R and addiction theory by showing how the unfavourable effects of daily intensive use on recovery can be ameliorated by daily work resources. It also contributes to the recovery literature demonstrating how intensive internet use can trigger recovery and the circumstances under which this happens.

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