The Open UniversitySkip to content
 

Anaesthetists' views of managing children's pain post-surgery

Simons, Joan; carter, Bernie; Craske, Jennie; Parry, Sarah; Coles, Sally and Bennett, Michelle (2017). Anaesthetists' views of managing children's pain post-surgery. Pain News, 15(4) pp. 181–184.

Full text available as:
[img]
Preview
PDF (Accepted Manuscript) - Requires a PDF viewer such as GSview, Xpdf or Adobe Acrobat Reader
Download (416kB) | Preview
URL: https://www.britishpainsociety.org/static/uploads/...
Google Scholar: Look up in Google Scholar

Abstract

This study explored the views, knowledge and use of pain assessment tools of 185 anaesthetists working Europe via an e-survey, which included three scenarios of children with varying degrees of unresolved pain. Our findings were that the three most frequently used pain assessment tools were VAS, FLACC and FACES. Anaesthetists appear to value the judgement of both parents and nurses in assessing a child’s pain, as they reported that in cases of uncertainty about a child’s pain, they would ‘ask the parent’ (n=88) or ‘ask a nurse’ (n=81). Fewer than half used a pain assessment tool with ‘most patients’ and some respondents were dismissive of the value of pain tools preferring to rely on ‘common sense’ or ‘clinical judgement’. Opportunities were identified regarding multidisciplinary education related to children’s pain management practice.

Item Type: Journal Item
ISSN: 2050-4500
Academic Unit/School: Faculty of Wellbeing, Education and Language Studies (WELS) > Health, Wellbeing and Social Care > Health and Social Care
Faculty of Wellbeing, Education and Language Studies (WELS) > Health, Wellbeing and Social Care
Faculty of Wellbeing, Education and Language Studies (WELS)
Item ID: 52796
Depositing User: Joan Simons
Date Deposited: 12 Jan 2018 14:48
Last Modified: 18 Jun 2019 18:08
URI: http://oro.open.ac.uk/id/eprint/52796
Share this page:

Download history for this item

These details should be considered as only a guide to the number of downloads performed manually. Algorithmic methods have been applied in an attempt to remove automated downloads from the displayed statistics but no guarantee can be made as to the accuracy of the figures.

Actions (login may be required)

Policies | Disclaimer

© The Open University   contact the OU