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Persistent stability of a chaotic system

Huber, Greg; Pradas, Marc; Pumir, Alain and Wilkinson, Michael (2018). Persistent stability of a chaotic system. Physica A: Statistical Mechanics and its Applications, 492 pp. 517–523.

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DOI (Digital Object Identifier) Link: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.physa.2017.10.042
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Abstract

We report that trajectories of a one-dimensional model for inertial particles in a random velocity field can remain stable for a surprisingly long time, despite the fact that the system is chaotic. We provide a detailed quantitative description of this effect by developing the large-deviation theory for fluctuations of the finite-time Lyapunov exponent of this system. Specifically, the determination of the entropy function for the distribution reduces to the analysis of a Schrödinger equation, which is tackled by semi-classical methods. The system has generic instability properties, and we consider the broader implications of our observation of long-term stability in chaotic systems.

Item Type: Journal Item
Copyright Holders: 2017 Elsevier B.V.
ISSN: 0378-4371
Project Funding Details:
Funded Project NameProject IDFunding Body
Not SetPHY1125915National Science Foundation
Keywords: stochastic analysis methods; nonlinear dynamics and chaos; fluctuation phenomena; random processes; noise; Brownian motion; Butterfly Effect
Academic Unit/School: Faculty of Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics (STEM) > Mathematics and Statistics
Faculty of Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics (STEM)
Item ID: 52689
Depositing User: Marc Pradas
Date Deposited: 20 Dec 2017 11:55
Last Modified: 17 Oct 2018 11:41
URI: http://oro.open.ac.uk/id/eprint/52689
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