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The Main Belt Comets and ice in the Solar System

Snodgrass, Colin; Agarwal, Jessica; Combi, Michael; Fitzsimmons, Alan; Guilbert-Lepoutre, Aurelie; Hsieh, Henry H.; Hui, Man-To; Jehin, Emmanuel; Kelley, Michael S. P.; Knight, Matthew M.; Opitom, Cyrielle; Orosei, Roberto; de Val-Borro, Miguel and Yang, Bin (2017). The Main Belt Comets and ice in the Solar System. Astronomy and Astrophysics Review, 25(1), article no. 5.

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DOI (Digital Object Identifier) Link: https://doi.org/10.1007/s00159-017-0104-7
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Abstract

We review the evidence for buried ice in the asteroid belt; specifically the questions around the so-called Main Belt Comets (MBCs). We summarise the evidence for water throughout the Solar System, and describe the various methods for detecting it, including remote sensing from ultraviolet to radio wavelengths. We review progress in the first decade of study of MBCs, including observations, modelling of ice survival, and discussion on their origins. We then look at which methods will likely be most effective for further progress, including the key challenge of direct detection of (escaping) water in these bodies.

Item Type: Journal Item
Copyright Holders: 2017 The Authors
ISSN: 1432-0754
Keywords: comets: general; minor planets; asteroids: general; methods: observational
Academic Unit/School: Faculty of Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics (STEM) > Physical Sciences
Faculty of Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics (STEM)
Research Group: Space
Item ID: 52344
Depositing User: Colin Snodgrass
Date Deposited: 15 Nov 2017 14:02
Last Modified: 04 May 2019 14:05
URI: http://oro.open.ac.uk/id/eprint/52344
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