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Thriving in the 21st century: Learning Literacies for the Digital Age (LLiDA project): Executive Summary, Conclusions and Recommendations

Beetham, Helen; McGill, Lou and Littlejohn, Allison (2009). Thriving in the 21st century: Learning Literacies for the Digital Age (LLiDA project): Executive Summary, Conclusions and Recommendations. UK Joint Information Systems Committees (JISC).

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Abstract

LLiDA set out to:
 review the evidence of change in the contexts of learning, including the nature of work,nknowledge, social life and citizenship, communications media and other technologies
 review current responses to these challenges from the further and higher education sectors, in terms of:
a) the kinds of capabilities valued, taught for and assessed (especially as revealed through
competence frameworks);
b) the ways in which capabilities are supported ('provision')
c) the value placed on staff and student 'literacies of the digital'
 collect original data concerning current practice in literacies provision in UK FE and HE, including 15 institutional audits and over 40 examples of forward thinking practice
 offer conclusions and recommendations, in terms of the same issues reviewed in 2

Item Type: Other
Copyright Holders: 2009 The Authors
Extra Information: 18 pp.
Keywords: online learning; e-learning; higher education; learning literacy; digital literacy
Academic Unit/School: Learning and Teaching Innovation (LTI) > Institute of Educational Technology (IET)
Learning and Teaching Innovation (LTI)
Item ID: 52237
Depositing User: Allison Littlejohn
Date Deposited: 08 Jan 2018 11:01
Last Modified: 07 Dec 2018 14:01
URI: http://oro.open.ac.uk/id/eprint/52237
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